Overblog
Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog

Présentation

  • : Histoires d'un scaphandrier or the Stories of a Commercial Diver
  • Histoires d'un scaphandrier or the Stories of a Commercial Diver
  • : Plongeur-Scaphandrier durant de très très nombreuses années, j'en ai vécu des choses sous eau et ailleurs. POUR VOIR TOUT LES ARTICLES PUBLIES ALLEZ AU BAS DE LA PAGE ET CLIQUER SUR TOP ARTICLES. TO SEE ALL THE STORIES GO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE AND CLIC ON TOP ARTICLES
  • Contact

14 mai 2016 6 14 /05 /mai /2016 18:09
Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

I liked the nickname that had been given to me by Jean-Pierre I. one of the fathers of French professional dive tables, when he had come to visit us on jobsite. At the time, we were working on the DSV ORELIA in the waters of the Persian Gulf on the famous spool pieces installation project and apparently he was present in the dive control room on a day where I was doing some oxy-arc cutting at the bottom of the sea. Apparently my performance had impressed him although for me the cutting of that day represented nothing extraordinary.

I must say that at time I had already throughout my career cut more than 4000 meters of steel of all kinds under water.

Admittedly, as Obelix, I fell into it (the cutting) when I went on my first diving project.

Still half a kid, I had just been engaged by AD, a Brussels diving firm. It sent me on a demolition work in Ghent Rodenhuizen where we had to remove various reinforced concrete sections in a discharge channel in order to increase the throughput.

The first part of the work had been done a few weeks earlier with explosives, unfortunately, due to a miscalculation of the charge, not only the wall in question was gone, but the road above the work place as well as a side wall had also suffered heavy damage. Result, the use of explosives was forbidden and further works had to be done by hand.

Ah, what I have suffered during this first week.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Working horizontally with a 36 kg jackhammer during six hours a day in hot water and a strong current: phew! I was dead. My hands were bleeding and I could not feel my ribs anymore due to vibration and shock waves generated by the machine, but as I was on probation, I wanted to hold on.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Obviously, who said reinforced concrete, also said rebar’s reinforcement. Result; a few days after my arrival, the technical director brought us a submarine burning torch on site.

He quickly explained us how it was working and then up to us to cut all these steel bars.

The torch was the American Victor oxygen / hydrogen gas burner. It could burn under water thanks to a small cap located around the flame, in which compressed air was continuously sent.

I immediately loved this tool. It was enough to put the nozzle of the torch against the bar, count to three while verifying that the steel takes out a red cherry colour, then press a lever to permit a stream of oxygen to be drained on the metal and burn it in a wreath of sparks.

It was great and I had a hell of time.

A few months later, I had now to go in a factory in Vilvoorde to cut out a small UPN 80 frame.

This time my boss had given me a Pirocopt torch made to be used above water but that could also be used under water by screwing a special head on it. This second cutting job was not very convincing because it took me no less than 2 hours 30 minutes, a dozen yo-yo’s to come back to surface to relight my torch and 3 saw blades to end my work.

What they forgot to tell me that day, was that the oxygen / acetylene burning mixtures I was using became explosive from a certain pressure and as my depth was close to this limit, small explosions extinguished the flame nonstop.

1970 Félix C, King of Renault Gordini drivers and master in chicken breeding into an apartment, decides to take me with him to cut a ½ sheet pile into the river Sambre. He works for the famous SOGETRAM but is actually seconded to us as technical director and at the time, he's already a lot of years of experience behind him. I am very happy to be his tender, especially that this time he will use the famous Messer Griesheim gasoline torch.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

On the surface, the installation of all this material is quite laborious because we need to install a dozen bottles of oxygen, connect the bottle of gasoline and nitrogen, but also to heat water in a tank in order to pass the gas pipes in it so they do not freeze.

After one hour, all the equipment is ready and now Felix explains me the adjustment of the valves positions on the torch.

We are ready for an ignition trial. To this end, he sets some rag on a piece of wood, soaks it with a few drops of gasoline and lit the whole.

- Baoum, the torch ignites with a deafening noise. It vibrates so much because of its 15 bars of pressure that I'm afraid it explodes in my hands.

- Well you saw how to do it Felix asks me?

Fifteen minutes later, my diver is ready in his in Spirotechnique constant volume suit.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

While he’s holding himself at the small boat, I fearfully grab the burning gear and following the instructions start the ignition procedure.

- One, first opens the oxygen heating valve of a turn and a half.

- Two, open the gasoline supply valve half a turn.

- Three light.

I crack a match to ignite the end of the rag, but because of the wind it is extinguished immediately. New essay, new fail. Meanwhile, the gasoline continues to be sprayed out of the nozzle of the torch.

Third attempt, ditto, I tremble so much that this time I break the match.

Finally the fourth attempt will be the good one. The rag is burning; carefully I approach it from the nozzle.

- Baoum!

That’s it the torch is lit, but just like the first time it makes so much noise that I’m afraid of it and therefore throw it immediately in water.

- SHIT, what happens? About thirty meters of the river is now burning because of all the gasoline that was spilled there during the ignition attempt.

Needless to say that I was bawling out copiously that day.

My next cutting lesson will be with Master Pierre, our oxy-arc cutting specialist. Together we go for Charleroi where a pile has to be cut against the concrete floor on the inclined wall of the bank.

The material used is somewhat similar to that used for arc welding, except that the electrodes are hollow to allow the passage of a jet of oxygen.

- Hey Pierre! Water and electricity do not mix very well do I not risk to be electrocuted?

- Do not worry young boy, we are using direct current, it is much less dangerous than the AC and with your rubber gloves you shouldn’t normally feel it much.

- Well, now take your rods and don’t come up before it is cut.

Sure enough, I am quickly reassured, off course in those days a knife switch is not yet known by the Belgian divers and as expected I receive a few electric shocks from time to time but nothing serious.

Because barges are passing continuously it’s not easy to keep my position on this slope but finally, about three hours later the piece of steel is cut and very proudly I can pick up a rope to bring it to the surface.

Obviously, three hours to cut one sheet pile is long, but at least this time I did not finish at the hacksaw. As I still wanted to cut more Pierre took me with him again a few days later to complete the cutting of a complete cofferdam consisting this time of a hundred piles.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

As often in our waters, visibility was nil but despite that my performance went rapidly from 1.5 to 2 piles per hour to three to four piles which for a first real cutting job was not too bad following Mr. Pierre claims.

1972 I change from company and now work for BDC from Antwerp. There, the work is often more technical and more difficult than what I have experienced before and cutting works are much more common.

In this company, everything cutting is made with a gas burning torch but unfortunately for me this tool is currently only reserved at the elite divers, that is to say the two bosses.

Result at the beginning of my incorporation, I could help, but not cut. Then finally, due to insisting my boss decided some months later to give me a first cutting course in one of Antwerp docks.

The craft he put in my hands was nothing else than the PICARD P9 the famous French torch designed in the 30s who despite his advanced age, had if we except the gasoline torch no competitor capable to cut as well.

Once in the water, I was blown away to see what this torch could cut but mostly of all I could now realize by myself that this tool could cut much faster than any oxy-arc rod.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Over the following weeks, I waited impatiently for the next cutting project where the boss had promised me I could intervene.

Indeed, two months later the project in question arrived. Our boss had just gone on vacation at his villa in Spain, when a customer called to come and cut a long sheet pile curtain.

What to do call back our specialist? No way. René my colleague and I were going to do this job without bothering anyone.

Result; here we are both of us in the Ghent waters. The first day, the performance was not extraordinary because we had to find our marks, but it increased day by day and one week later the curtain had disappeared.

Apparently satisfied, the boss took me under his wing, and both of us worked regularly together to cut the numerous cofferdams who had served to the widening of the Albert Canal.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Result in a few months I became the King of the underwater cutters. On each job, Jaap (my boss) and myself did the race to see which of us manage to cut the extra length in an hour, but no luck for me as unquestionably had stayed the Emperor of this technique because every time he beat me by a few tens of centimetres.

Years passing, I had become a freelance diver and my log books already contained info about the cutting of the few kilometres of steel I had made underwater.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Personally, I was also very proud of some of my performance, because at a time, I even beat a speed record during the construction of the Van Damme lock at Zeebrugge, where I had still using the Picard torch, managed to make a 16.5 m vertical cut in pile in no less than 15 minutes.

Yet any king may one day waver from his throne.

Thus, in November 89 my colleague Rik who now had his business called me one day for the cutting of a twenty meters long curtain. To help me, he gave me a young and strong assistant. While he was preparing the cutting gear, I kept warm in the van because outside it was getting chilly.

While I was dressing, I made a quick estimate on how long it would take me to do the job and so know how many under garments I had to put on.

OK: more or less two hours, then three thermal underwear must suffice.

I’m ready. I test the torch, its good oxygen is coming well. My assistant put a packet of electrodes in my quiver, I can go. Again, the visibility is bad, but I can cut against the concrete slab which greatly facilitates my work.

As I did cut quite often this year, I have kept the "filling" and therefore move rather quickly and sure of me I do not waste time checking my kerf. As expected, two hours later I’m out of the water.

- Go ahead, you can start removing.

The crane operator installs its vibration pile driver on the first sheet pile and starts pulling. The entire curtain vibrates but the sheet pile remains.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Uh! Changes to the next.

Same! Nothing comes.

On the contrary, we can see that little by little it is the entire sheet pile that comes up and not the part that I cut. Immediately, I stop the manoeuvre.

- Herman, give me a saw blade, I'll go check.

Once back in the water, I gently pass the blade in the kerf my cup. Horror! None of the slots are fully cut. How is this possible? Yet I have not changed my technique. Sceptical, I go out of the water and immediately head to the oxygen rack to look at the pressure on the regulator.

Two bars, not enough pressure to chase the molten metal throughout its thickness. I usually, regulates everything myself and set up a pressure of 4 to 5 bar, but this time I preferred to stay warm and to trust my young assistant.

Result as punishment I find myself an extra hour in the water burning an extra electrode in each interlock and off course appear to be a poor cutter in the eyes of crane operator and my assistant.

Sometimes we can also seem to be bad cutter after the wickedness of some colleagues as happened to me on a cutting site in Dunkirk.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

At the time, I had just quit the offshore recently to return in a diving company as an employee and so benefit from the whole system which later (that is to say now) would allow me to touch a retreat.

So there on this site, for I don’t know what obscure reason, a so-called "colleague" amused himself by deliberately sabotaging my work by reducing the needed cutting Amps so as to make me look like a "has been" in the customer's eyes.

Having had some doubts when I left the water, it did not take me long to get confirmation. Following this event, I immediately swung my resignation to the head of my recent boss while telling him the evil that I thought of his band of rednecks.

But finally this sabotage was a good thing for me because thanks to it, I quickly quit a company where a certain Mr. Ron Hubbard became too present for my taste.

Fortunately, this changing once more raises my reputation and I was again on the paths of glory.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

In December 2000, my colleague Mark praised us, Thierry our young diver and myself to give him a hand on a cutting job he had win in France. And so here we are all three on the Champagne roads. The job consisted again in the cutting of a small cofferdam. As often, I proposed to make the first dive. Of course, like a real pro, I test myself all the cutting gear and set the correct cutting pressure as we remember they got me once but not twice.

It's good, everything works. In the water, the access to the cut line is difficult because the place is very small. Moreover, I have to start my cut in a corner where I can just pass my arm.

Never mind, I put myself in position and asks the juice. Immediately the arc strike is heard but strangely the oxygen does not reach to the end of my rod.

- Make it cold!

- It is cold!

I immediately check the torch, push the lever and the oxygen flows.

New try, but again nothing comes out. I unscrew the head of the torch, put a new electrode, but nothing happens. When I ask the current and I press my rod against the steel to start my cut the O² stops coming out.

- Surface, take the torch up and check the washer.

No sooner said than done.

- Francis, the washer has nothing but was nonetheless we have replaced it.

In water it is always the same but I begin to understand what is happening. I lose a bit the electrode and ask for the contact. This time it works. That's what I thought, when the electrode is fully inserted into the head it compresses the washer too much and the orifice of the latter closes, result no more oxygen passes.

- Tell me Mark, you have other washers?

- No they are all the same, why?

- They are too soft, fucking skinflint Dutchman, you again looked at three under.

- Never mind, I'll manage like this.

Result, during my three hours at the bottom, I manage to cut but with a lot of difficulty and I feel that I do bullshit.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Apart from the cold I cannot feel my fingers anymore and it’s therefore hard to feel the end of the kerf. At the surface, the foreman turns round because we made him understand that this would go a lot faster.

Fresh out of the water, here he slings immediately the first sheet pile and begins to pull.

Hey, nothing moves.

Mark asks him to try the next.

Willy-nilly the guy runs grumbling, but same result.

Unfortunately, the crane has not a high lifting capacity and the crane operator does not want to "break" the sheet piles by pulling them sideways as is sometimes done at home if they do not come. As expected, the tone rises quickly between the foreman and me.

- Damn, pull a little more with your bloody crane.

- No way, it's been 10 years that I remove sheet piling and I tell you that they are not cut.

- And me it’s 30 years that I cut them and I tell you they are cut.

Mark on his side saw that his job turned to shit and did not know what to think: trust his Emeritus cutter or give reason to the client.

- Ok Thierry, will you get dressed and check the cut.

15 minutes later, Thierry was in the water and called for the torch to cut the small hangers that I had left.

Shame on me, I did not know where to put myself; I had only one desire: throw myself into the water and never have to suffer this insult.

On the surface, the foreman was jubilant and shouted to anyone who would listen that he knew they were not cut.

For me, 30 years of glory came to fly in a dive. Like what, no one is infallible.

Following this failure, I thought my reputation forever damned. Fortunately, thanks to odd jobs like this, I regained confidence in me.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Then one day in March 2003, one of our French clients called me.

- Hi Francis, François from S..e here.

- Say I call you because we have a big problem in the port of Calais.

- We have driven a new 96” pile (Ø 240 cm) there but apparently it hinders the manoeuvres of the ferry at terminal 5.

- The problem is that it is 7 cm thick and should be cut as soon as possible.

- How long would it take you to cut it with the oxy - arc?

- Stand by, I do a quick calculation!

- So, 240 x 3.14 x 7/25 = 211 x 3 = 633 = 10:30 hours.

- Oh no, that's way too long.

- could you blow it?

I knew the port installations well and automatically thought it would not be easy, but when you talk to me of explosives, I never say no because it is another specialty that I like practicing.

- Good listen François, give me an hour and I'll call you back.

- OK hear you soon.

After hanging up, I began to calculate the amount of explosives that I would need to cut that pile if I used a plaster charge. Pfew! Almost 125 kilos of dynamite, that was too much, I would cut out the tube but the shock wave and the ground vibration would damage whatever is nearby.

So to forget. What I have left? Severing the tube with a shaped charge?

I grabbed my phone and called an acquaintance in Aberdeen who worked for a company specialized in the dismantling oil platform with explosives.

A few minutes later, I had the answer to my question.

As promised, less than an hour later, I recalled my client :

- François, I’ve a good and bad news, which you want to hear first?

- The bad.

- Good with a plaster charge it is impossible because it would demolish everything, but I made contact with a company that manufactures shaped charges.

- With that, we would use much less explosives and it would be feasible, the problem is that they need a minimum 5-6 weeks to make the charge and if I tell you the price charged for such manufacture without implementation, you'll make me a heart attack.

- OK go ahead.

The amount that I communicated to him left him speechless for several seconds.

- And what's the good news?

- If you were interested in a much more economical solution, I just cut your tube with a gas burning torch for so many euros.

Thus, a week later, I was there with my team.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

As the client wanted a short intervention to avoid the closure of that terminal for many hours, we would show them what we, the little Belgians divers were able to do.

At 3:35 p.m. my old buddy Chris nicknamed Papy Two and myself descended inside the pipe with our torches and went down to the bottom at 18 meter deep.

Thirteen ( 13) minutes later, the 4900 cm² steel were cut.

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

Phew, I could now finish my cutting career on this beautiful performance and stay forever,

Me, Francis the fastest cutter at the east of Marseille

"The fastest cutter at the east of Marseille"

Papy One

14 mai 2016 6 14 /05 /mai /2016 18:06

  mes-derni-res-plong-es01013.jpg 

Cela me plaisait bien ce surnom que m’avait un jour donné Jean-Pierre I. l'un des pères des tables de plongée professionnelle Française, alors qu’il était venu nous faire une petite visite sur chantier.

A l’époque, nous travaillions sur la barge ORELIA dans les eaux du Golfe Persique sur le fameux chantier de pose de manchettes et apparemment il avait assisté depuis le poste de contrôle à une de mes prestations de découpage qui semble-t-il ne l’avait pas laissé indifférent.

Pour moi pourtant, cela ne représentait rien d’extraordinaire, car à cette époque, j’avais au cours de ma carrière déjà découpé sous eau, plus de 4000 mètres d’acier en tout genre.

Il faut dire que comme Obélix, j’étais tombé dedans dès mon tout premier chantier.

Encore à moitié gamin, je venais tout juste d’être embauché par A.D, une firme de plongée bruxelloise.

Celle-ci, m’envoya sur un chantier de démolition à Gand Rodenhuizen où il fallait enlever divers pans de mur en béton armé dans un canal de rejet afin d’en augmenter le débit.

Une première partie des travaux avait été réalisé quelques semaines plus tôt à l’aide d’explosifs, malheureusement, suite à un mauvais calcul de la charge, non seulement le pan de mur en question était parti, mais la route surplombant les travaux ainsi qu’un mur latéral, avaient eux aussi subi de gros dégâts.

Résultat, autorisation d’emploi d’explosifs supprimée et suite des travaux à la main.

Ah, là qu’est-ce que j’en ai bavé au cours de cette première semaine.

 

Papy-One--219-.jpg 

 

Faire du marteau piqueur et du brise béton, durant 6 heures par jour dans une eau super chaude avec un courant pas possible, j’étais mort.

J’avais les mains en sang et je ne sentais plus mes côtes à cause des vibrations et des ondes de choc générées par la machine, mais comme j’étais en période d’essai, je voulais tenir bon.

 Papy-One--260-.jpg

   

Evidemment, qui dit béton armé, dit également ferraillage.

Résultat, quelques jours après mon arrivée, le directeur technique nous apporta un chalumeau découpeur sous-marin sur le chantier.

Rapidement il nous en expliqua le fonctionnement et, maintenant démerdez vous pour me couper toutes ces barres d’acier.

Le chalumeau de marque Victor, fonctionnait avec un mélange oxygène / hydrogène et il pouvait parfaitement brûler sous eau grâce à une petite coiffe située autour de la flamme, dans laquelle était envoyé en permanence de l’air comprimé.

Immédiatement, j’étais emballé par cet outil.

Il suffisait de poser le bec du chalumeau contre la barre, compter jusqu’à 3 en vérifiant que l’acier prenne bien une teinte couleur rouge cerise, puis presser le levier d’oxygène dont le jet faisait alors immédiatement fondre le métal sous une gerbe d’étincelle.

C’était super, et je m’amusais comme un petit fou.

Quelques mois plus tard, il me fallait maintenant aller découper une petite cornière métallique d’une dizaine de centimètres dans une usine de Vilvoorde.

Cette fois, le boss m’avait donné un chalumeau découpeur Pirocopt de surface sur lequel je devais visser une tête spéciale pour qu’il puisse fonctionner sous eau.

Pas très convainquant mon découpage, car il me fallut pas moins de 2 h 30, une douzaine de yo-yo pour venir rallumer mon chalumeau en surface, ainsi que 3 lames de scie pour venir à bout de mon travail.

Ce qu’on avait oublié de me dire ce jour là, c’était que le mélange oxygène / acétylène que j’utilisais devenait explosif à partir d’une certaine pression et comme ma profondeur d’intervention était proche de cette limite, les mini explosions éteignaient mon chalumeau sans arrêt.

1970, Félix C, le Roi de la conduite en Renault Gordini et Maître de l’élevage de poulet en appartement, décide de me prendre avec lui pour aller découper une ½ palplanche dans la Sambre.

Il travaille en fait pour la célèbre SOGETRAM, mais est détaché chez nous en tant que directeur technique et à l’époque, il a déjà pas mal d’années d’expérience derrière lui.

Je suis donc très content de pouvoir l’assister, surtout que cette fois il va utiliser le fameux chalumeau à essence Messer Griesheim.

En surface, l’installation de tout ce matériel est assez laborieux car il nous faut installer une dizaine de bouteilles d’oxygène, brancher la bouteille d’essence et d’azote, mais également faire chauffer de l’eau dans une cuve pour y faire passer les tubulures de gaz afin qu’ils ne givrent pas.

Au bout d’une heure, tout le matériel est prêt et Félix m’explique maintenant le réglage de la position des vannes sur le chalumeau.

Nous sommes prêt pour un essai d’allumage.

A cet effet, il fixe un petit bout de chiffon sur un bout de bois, l’imbibe de quelques gouttes d’essence et allume le tout.

-         BAOUM, Le chalumeau s’enflamme dans un bruit assourdissant.

Il vibre tellement à cause de ses 15 bars de pression que j’ai peur qu’il m’explose dans les mains.

-         Bon tu as vu comment faire me demande Félix ?

Quinze minutes plus tard, le voila prêt dans son volume constant Spiro.

   Felix Cobos à Chatelet 

 

 Pendant qu’il se tient à la barcasse, moi j’empoigne craintivement l’engin et conformément aux instructions qu’il m’a donné, commence la procédure d’allumage.

-         Un, d’abord ouvrir la vanne d’oxygène de chauffe d’un tour et demi.

-         Deux, ouvrir la vanne d’arrivée d’essence d’un demi tour.

-         Trois, allumer.

Je craque l’allumette destinée à allumer le bout de chiffon, mais à cause du vent elle s’éteint aussitôt.

Nouvelle tentative, nouvel échec.

Pendant ce temps, l’essence continue à être projetée hors du bec du chalumeau.

Troisième tentative, idem, je tremble tellement d’angoisse que je casse l’allumette.

Finalement le quatrième essai sera le bon.

Mon chiffon brûle, prudemment je l’approche du bec.

-         BAOUM !

Ça y est le chalumeau c’est allumé, mais tout comme la première fois il fait tellement de bruit que j’en ai peur et de ce fait je le jette immédiatement dans l’eau.

-         MERDE, qu’est-ce qui se passe ?

La rivière vient de prendre feu sur une trentaine de mètres à cause de l’essence qui s’y était répandu pendant la tentative d’allumage.

Inutile de dire que ce jour là, j’ai pris un savon de première.

Ma leçon suivante se fera avec Maître Pierre, le spécialiste du découpage oxy-arc.

Ensemble nous partons pour Charleroi où il faut découper une palplanche au ras du béton sur le mur incliné de la berge.

Le matériel utilisé ressemble un peu à celui utilisé pour le soudage à l’arc, sauf qu’ici les électrodes sont creuses afin de permettre le passage d’un jet d’oxygène.

-         Dis Pierre, l’eau et l’électricité ça ne fait tout de même pas bon ménage ? Est-ce que je ne risque pas de me faire électrocuter ?

-         T’inquiètes pas Petit, on utilise du courant continu, c’est beaucoup moins dangereux que l’alternatif et avec tes gants en caoutchouc tu ne devais en principe pas sentir grand-chose.

-         Bon, maintenant tu y vas et tu ne remontes pas avant que se soit coupé.

Effectivement, une fois avoir commencé je suis rassuré, juste une petite châtaigne de temps en temps.

A cause des péniches qui passent, il ne met pas facile de me positionner et de rester sur ce mur incliné.

Finalement, près de 3 heures plus tard le morceau d’acier se détache et tout fier je peux venir chercher une corde pour le remonter en surface.

Evidemment, 3 heures pour une palplanche c’est long, mais au moins cette fois je n’ai pas du terminer à la scie à métaux.

Comme j’en voulais encore, Pierre me prit à nouveau avec lui quelques jours plus tard pour réaliser le découpage d’un batardeau constitué cette fois d’une bonne centaine de palplanches.

 

Papy One (96) 

 Comme bien souvent dans nos eaux, la visibilité était nulle, mais malgré cela mon rendement passa rapidement de 1,5 à 2 palplanches à l’heure à plus ou moins 3 à 4 palplanches ce qui pour un premier vrai chantier de découpage n’était pas trop mauvais aux dires de Maître Pierre.

1972, je change d’entreprise et part maintenant bosser pour la BDC d’Anvers.

Là, les travaux sont souvent bien plus technique et plus difficile que ce que j’ai connu auparavant et les découpages y sont bien plus fréquent.

Dans cette entreprise, tout se découpe au chalumeau sous-marin, malheureusement pour moi, cet outil n’est pour l’instant réservé qu’à l’élite des plongeurs, c'est-à-dire aux deux patrons.

Résultat, au début de mon incorporation, je pouvais aider, mais pas couper.

Puis finalement, à force d’insistance le patron se décida quelque mois plus tard à me donner un premier cours de découpage dans un des docks d’Anvers.

L’engin qu’il me mit entre les mains n’était rien d’autre que le PICARD P9, célèbre chalumeau Français des années 30 qui malgré son age avancé, n’avait à l’exception du chalumeau à essence aucun concurrent capable de découper aussi bien.

Une fois dans l’eau, j’étais époustouflé de voir ce que ce chalumeau pouvait découper, mais surtout je pouvais maintenant me rendre compte par moi-même que cet outil coupait bien plus rapidement que l’oxy-arc.

 

papy 2 

Au cours des semaines suivantes, j’attendais impatiemment le prochain chantier de découpage où, le patron me l’avait promis, je pourrais intervenir.

Effectivement, deux mois plus tard le chantier en question arriva.

Notre boss, venait de partir en vacance dans sa villa d’Espagne, lorsqu’un client appela pour venir découper un long rideau de palplanches.

Que faire, rappeler notre spécialiste ? Pas question.

René mon collègue et moi allions le faire ce découpage sans embêter personne.

Résultat, nous voilà tous les deux à Gand.

Le premier jour, le rendement n’était pas mirobolant car il fallait que nous trouvions nos marques, mais il augmenta de jour en jour et au bout d’une semaine le rideau avait disparu.

Apparemment satisfait du résultat, le patron me prit sous son aile, et à nous deux nous partions régulièrement découper les nombreux batardeaux qui avaient servi aux travaux d’élargissement du canal Albert.

   

img432 

Résultat, en quelques mois j’étais devenu le Roi des découpeurs.

Sur chaque chantier, Jaap (le boss) et moi même faisions la course pour savoir lequel de nous deux parviendrait à découper le plus de longueur en une heure, mais pas de chance pour moi car lui restait incontestablement l’Empereur de cette discipline et à chaque fois il me battait de quelques dizaines de centimètre.

Les années passant, j’étais maintenant devenu freelance et les kilomètres d’acier découpé au chalumeau ou à l’oxy-arc commençaient à s’accumuler dans mes log books.

   

Papy One (251) 

Personnellement, j’étais d’ailleurs très fier de certaines de mes prestations, car à une époque, j’avais même battu un record de vitesse lors de la construction de l’écluse Van Damme à Zeebrugge où j’avais, toujours à l’aide du chalumeau Picard, réussi à faire une découpe verticale dans une palplanche de 16,5 m en pas moins de 15 minutes.

Pourtant, n’importe quel roi peut un jour vaciller de son trône.

Ainsi, en novembre 89 mon collègue Rik qui lui aussi avait maintenant son entreprise m’appela un jour pour vite aller lui découper un rideau d’une vingtaine de mètres de longueur.

Pour m’aider, il m’avait donné Herman, un jeune et costaud assistant.

Pendant que celui-ci préparait le matériel de découpage, moi je m’équipais bien au chaud dans la camionnette car à l’extérieur il commençait à faire frisquet.

Pendant que je m’habillais, je fis une rapide estimation du temps que cela me prendrais afin de savoir combien de sous vêtement je devais mettre.

Deux bonnes heures, donc 3 petites souris suffiraient.

Ca y est, je suis prêt.

Je teste la pince, c’est bon l’oxygène sort bien.

 Mon assistant a mis un paquet d’électrodes dans mon carquois, je peux y aller.

Encore une fois, la « visi » est médiocre, mais je peux découper au ras du radier en béton ce qui facilite grandement mon travail.

Comme j’ai déjà découpé assez souvent cette année, j’ai gardé le « filling » et dès lors j’avance assez rapidement et certain de moi, je ne perds pas de temps à vérifier ma coupe.

Comme prévu, deux heures plus tard je sors de l’eau travail accompli.

-         Vas-y, tu peux commencer à enlever.

Le grutier installe son vibro-fonceur sur la première palplanche et commence à tirer.

 

ptc 

 Tout le rideau vibre, mais la palplanche concernée reste en place.

-         Euh ! Passe à la suivante.

Idem, rien ne vient.

Au contraire, on peut voir que petit à petit c’est toute la longueur de palplanche qui remonte et non le dessus que j’ai découpé.

Aussitôt, je fais stopper la manœuvre.

-         Herman, donne moi une lame de scie, je vais aller vérifier.

Une fois de retour dans l’eau, je passe délicatement la lame dans la saignée de ma coupe.

Horreur ! aucun des nœuds n’est coupé entièrement.

Comment est-ce possible ? Je n’ai pourtant rien changé à ma technique.

Sceptique, je sors de l’eau et me dirige aussitôt vers le cadre d’oxygène afin de vérifier la pression de tarage du mano détendeur.

Deux bars, ça y est j’ai compris, pas assez de pression pour chasser le métal en fusion sur toute son épaisseur.

Alors que d’habitude, je règle tout moi-même et me met une pression de 4 à 5 bars, cette fois-ci j’ai préféré rester au chaud et faire confiance à mon jeune gars.

Résultat, comme punition je me retrouve une heure de plus dans l’eau à repasser une électrode dans chaque nœud et à paraître piètre découpeur au yeux du grutier et de mon assistant.

On peut parfois aussi paraître mauvais découpeur suite à la méchanceté de certains collègues comme cela m’est arrivé sur un chantier de découpage à Dunkerque.

   

sollac gazometre 

 A l’époque, je venais juste de quitter l’offshore depuis quelques mois pour réintégrer une boite de plonge et tout le système qui plus tard (c'est-à-dire bientôt) devait me permettre de toucher une retraite.

Et donc là sur ledit chantier, je ne sais pour quelle obscure raison, un soit-disant «  collègue » s’amusait à délibérément saboter mon travail en réduisant au minimum l’intensité électrique nécessaire au découpage, de manière à me faire passer pour un « has been » aux yeux du client.

Ayant eu quelques doutes à ma sortie de l’eau, il ne me fallut pas longtemps pour en avoir la confirmation.

Suite à cet évènement, je balançai immédiatement ma démission à la tête de mon récent patron tout en  lui disant le mal que je pensais de sa bande de ploucs.

Mais finalement, ce sabotage m’avait été salutaire car grâce à lui, j’ai ainsi rapidement pu quitter une entreprise où un certain monsieur Ron Hubbard commençait à se faire bien trop présent à mon goût.

Heureusement, ce nouveau changement d’entreprise fit à nouveau monter ma cote de bon découpeur et j’étais à nouveau sur les chemins de la gloire.

  

img146 

En décembre 2000, mon collègue Mark qui à l’époque n’était pas encore surnommé Papy 3 nous loua Thierry, notre jeune ingénieur prolétaire et moi-même pour lui filer un coup de main sur un découpage qu’il avait déniché en France.

Tout content, nous voici donc tous les trois sur les routes de Champagne.

Le boulot consistait une nouvelle fois à découper un petit batardeau.

Comme bien souvent, je proposai de faire la première plongée.

Bien entendu, en tant que vrai pro, je teste à nouveau moi-même le matériel et la pression de découpage car on s’en rappelle, on m’a eu une fois mais pas deux.

C’est bon, tout fonctionne.

Dans l’eau, l’accès à la ligne de coupe est assez difficile car l’endroit est fort exigu.

De plus, je dois commencer ma découpe dans un coin où j’ai juste le bras qui passe.

Qu’à cela ne tienne, je me met en position et demande le jus.

Aussitôt l’arc électrique se fait entendre mais étrangement l’oxygène n’arrive pas au bout de la baguette.

-         Coupez !

-         C’est coupé.

Aussitôt, je vérifie la pince, pousse sur le levier et l’oxygène sort.

Nouvel essai, mais pareil rien ne sort.

Je dévisse la tête de la pince, y met une nouvelle électrode, mais rien n’y fait.

Dès que je demande le contact et que j’appuie mon électrode contre l’acier pour amorcer, l’O² ne sort plus.

-         surface, tu remontes la pince et tu vérifies le joint.

Si tôt dis, si tôt fait.

-         Francis, le joint n’a rien mais on l’a tout de même remplacé.

Dans l’eau c’est toujours pareil.

Je commence à comprendre ce qui se passe.

Je desserre un peu la baguette et redemande le contact.

Cette fois cela fonctionne.

C’est bien ce que je pensais, lorsque l’électrode est à fond dans la pince elle comprime trop le joint, et l’orifice de celui-ci se referme, résultat l’oxygène ne passe plus.

-         Dis moi Mark, tu as d’autres joints ?

-         Non se sont tous les mêmes, pourquoi ?

-         Ils sont trop mous, espèce d’Hollandais, tu as encore regardé à trois sous.

-         Bon tant pis, je vais me débrouiller comme ça.

Résultat, pendant mes trois heures au fond, je parviens à découper mais avec pas mal de difficulté et je sens bien que je merde.

 

DSC01709

 

En plus à cause du froid je ne sens plus mes doigts et j’ai dès lors du mal à retrouver chaque fin de coupe.

En surface, le chef de chantier commence à tourner en rond car on lui avait laissé entendre que cela irait beaucoup plus vite.

A peine sorti de l’eau, le voilà qui élingue immédiatement la première palplanche et commence à tirer dessus.

Aie, rien ne bouge.

Mark lui demande d’essayer la suivante.

Bon gré mal gré le gars s’exécute en râlant, mais même résultat.

Malheureusement la grue du chantier n’a pas une forte capacité de levage et le grutier ne veut pas « casser » les palplanches en tirant dessus latéralement comme cela se fait parfois chez nous si elles ne viennent pas.

Comme il fallait s’y attendre, très vite le ton monte entre le chef de chantier et moi.

-         Putain, tire un peu plus sur ta foutue grue.

-         Pas question, cela fait 10 ans que je tire des palplanches et je te dis qu’elles ne sont pas coupées.

-         Et moi cela fait 30 ans que j’en coupe et je te dis qu’elles sont coupées.

Mark de son coté voyant que son chantier partait en couille ne savait plus quoi penser.

Faire confiance à son découpeur émérite, ou donner raison au client.

-         Bon Thierry, tu veux bien t’équiper et allez vérifier la coupe.

15 minutes plus tard, Thierry était dans l’eau et demandait la pince pour découper les petits ponts que j’avais laissé.

Honte à moi, je ne savais plus où me mettre, je n’avais plus qu’une seule envie c’était de me jeter à l’eau pour ne plus avoir à souffrir de cet affront.

En surface, le chef de chantier jubilait et criait à qui voulait l’entendre qu’il le savait qu’elles n’étaient pas coupées.

Pour moi, 30 années de gloire venaient de s’envoler en une plongée.

Comme quoi, nul n’est infaillible.

Suite à cet échec, je pensais ma réputation de découpeur foutue à jamais.

Heureusement, grâce à quelques petits boulots de ce type, je repris confiance en moi.

 

Papy One (290) 

 Puis un jour de mars 2003, un de nos clients français m’appela.

-         Salut Francis, c’est François de chez S.

-         Dis je t’appelle car on a un gros problème dans le port de Calais.

-         On y a battu un nouveau pieu de 96 ’’ (240 cm) de diamètre, mais apparemment il gène la manœuvre des ferries du poste 5.

-         Le problème, c’est qu’il fait 7 cm d’épaisseur et il faudrait le couper le plus rapidement possible.

-         Combien de temps te faudrait-il à l’oxy - arc ?

-         Stand by, je fais un rapide calcul !

-         Donc, 240 x 3,14 x 7 / 25 = 211 x 3 = 633 = 10h30

-         Ah non, ça c’est beaucoup trop long.

-         Est-ce que tu pourrais le faire sauter ?

Je connaissais bien les installations du port et pensais d’office que cela ne serait pas facile, mais lorsqu’on me parle d'explosifs, je ne dis jamais non  car c’est une autre des spécialités que j’aime pratiquer.

-         Bon écoute François, laisse une petite heure et je te rappelle.

-         Ok à tout à l’heure.

Une fois raccroché, j’entrepris de calculer la quantité d’explosifs que j’aurais besoin pour découper ce pieu à l’aide d’une charge appliquée.

Oufti ! Près de 125 kilos de dynamite, ça c’était beaucoup trop, je couperais bien le pieu, mais l’onde de choc et les vibrations occasionneraient des dégâts à tout ce qui se trouve à proximité.

Donc à oublier.

Qu’est-ce qu’il me reste ?

Le découpage par charge creuse.

Je saisis mon téléphone et passai un coup de fil à une de mes connaissances à Aberdeen qui travaillait pour une compagnie spécialisé dans le démantèlement à l’explosif de plateforme pétrolière.

Quelques minutes plus tard, j’avais la réponse à ma question.

Comme promis, moins d’une heure plus tard, je rappelais François.

-         François, une bonne et une mauvaise nouvelle, laquelle tu veux entendre d’abord ?

-         La mauvaise.

-         Bon en charge appliquée, c’est impossible car on démolirait tout, mais j’ai pris contact avec une entreprise qui fabrique des charges creuses.

-         Avec ça, on utiliserait beaucoup moins d’explosifs et se serait réalisable, le hic, c’est qu’il leur faudrait minimum 5 à 6 semaines pour usiner la charge, et si je te dis le prix demandé pour cette fabrication, sans la mise en œuvre, tu vas me faire un infarctus.

-         Vas-y annonce.

Le montant que je lui communiquai le laissa sans voix pendant quelques secondes.

-         Et c’est quoi la bonne nouvelle ?

-         Si cela t’intéresse on a une solution bien plus économique, je viens découper ton tube au chalumeau pour autant d’ euros.

C’est ainsi, qu’une semaine plus tard, j’étais sur place avec ma petite équipe.

 

calais--1-.jpg

 

Comme le client souhaitait une découpe rapide pour ne pas bloquer le poste durant de nombreuses heures, nous allions leur montrer de quoi, nous, les petits plongeurs Belges étions capables.

A 15h35 mon vieux pote Chris surnommé Papy Two et moi-même nous nous mettions à l’eau.

Treize minutes plus tard, les 4900 cm² d’acier étaient découpés.

 

calais--7-.jpg

 

Ouf, je pouvais maintenant terminer ma carrière de découpeur sur ce beau coup et rester à tout jamais,

  

calais--9-.jpg 

 

« Le découpeur le plus rapide à l’Est de Marseille »

 

Papy One

 

 

 

11 avril 2016 1 11 /04 /avril /2016 08:49
Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Hi every one,

You can now download “The Little story of the Underwater Cutting” in one single printable document at:

https://www.academia.edu/24883704/The_Little_Story_of_the_Underwater_Cutting

The second method of cutting under water to have emerged uses the principle of arc welding. Here again, this invention is due to the genius of a few great men.

The first is simply the English physicist Sir Humphry David (Edmund’s cousin) who in 1813 managed to create an electrical arc under water.

It will then be necessary to wait until 1890 to see appearing a first patent for a process of arc welding. The problem is that this first method uses bare electrodes without coating and therefore the arc is very unstable and the welds of mediocre qualities.

Fortunately ten years later the first coated electrodes are invented thereby bringing the first welding jobs. Very quickly during these works welders are going to realize that by increasing the current intensity it was then possible to cut or rather melt thin sheets.

Nevertheless, it will again be necessary to wait until the middle of the First World War to see someone use this process under water.

The first under water metal-arc cutting essays with a welding rod seem to have begun simultaneously in France, the United Kingdom and in the United States.

In France tests are performed under water in 1917 by the Soudure Autogène Française Company with two types of electrode: small diameters steel électrodes and large diameters carbon electrodes.

But the generators that are used in those days in France are not powerful enough and the tests are inconclusive. As a result on the French side the electrical cutting trials will not resume before 1924 (115).

The British Admiralty seems to have had more success with this process since the Deep Diving and Submarine Operations book from Siebe-Gorman mentions that its divers used it during World War I (116).

At the American side it is to the firm Merritt-Chapman & Scott that returns the merit to have developed this system that will also be used on the S.S St Paul in addition to the gas burning torch.

Photo n° 60: Diver with cutting torch (117)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

From June 1918 R. E. Chapman and J. W. Kirk applies for a patent for a method of cutting under water by means of the intensity of an electric arc.

For that purpose, the inventors plan 3 manners to cut the steel.

1° by means of the only heat generated by the electric arc of a carbon electrode.

2° by means of a carbon electrode perforated by 3 holes allowing the passage of a flux of oxygen.

3° by means of a carbon electrode provided by two small pipes allowing the passage of a flux of oxygen.

Figure n°26: description of the process (118)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

In practice we will later see that only the use of the hollow electrode will be favoured.

This patent will be followed a little later by another one also filed by Chapman concerning this time the electric cutting torch which is used by its divers.

Figure n°27: Sketch cutting torch (119)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Photo n° 61: oxy-arc cutting torch (120)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

To train its workers to this new technique a training tank is installed within the company and very quickly the divers will adopt this technique to make some difficult cuttings.

Photo n° 62: Merritt-Chapman & Scott cutting equipment and training tank (121)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

One of the first practical uses will be done in 1919 on the freighter Lord Dufferin. It collided with the steamer AQUITANIA and to prevent it from sinking the ship had been stranded on the island of the Statue of Liberty. About twenty meters from its stern had been partially ripped off and to allow its dry-docking, the divers had to cut by oxy-arc about 8 tons of wrinkled sheets.

Photo n° 63: Lord Dufferin in dry dock (122)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Another great performance realized by the guys of this company took place in New York in February 1922. At that time a dredge accidentally pierced a 36 inches drinking water pipeline feeding Stade Island one of the New York districts.

Photo n° 64: Cutting training (123)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

The repair planned to remove the damaged section and replace it with a steel spool piece.

Several working days were necessary to clear the damaged part of the pipe which rested under a thick layer of mud and thus enable divers to start cutting. But the job is not simple because despite the mud removal some sections of the pipe must be cut from the inside which one can imagine was far from comfortable with a Mark V helmet on the head.

Furthermore, the main was made of thick (80 mm) cast iron which we know is not readily oxidized. Despite these difficulties the divers finally managed to complete this work within 9 days during which they plunged 24h / 24h and cut not less than 10 linear meters of pipe (124).

Photo n° 65: Removal of the damaged section (125)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

And to end we can still mention the cutting realized by John Tooker in also some difficult conditions of around thirty piles that were protecting one of the Texas bridge piles on the Atchafalaya River, Melville which had been torn away and twisted by a big timber fender pier adrift.

Figure n° 28: Detail of sheet piling (126)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

The work that began November 17, 1922 had required 114 hours of diving among which 67 hours were devoted exclusively to oxy-arc cutting (127).

Becoming aware of the capacities of this electrical cutting tool the US Navy will also develop a first oxy-arc cutting torch. Unlike the Chapman and Kirch torch which we recall is straight, the US Navy one is square and can work with an electrode pointing at 90 °. Among those who participated in the design and the trials we find in particular the Chief Petty Officer John Henry "Dick" Turpin, who was one of the first African American Navy divers.

Photo n° 66: The diver J. H. Turpin (128)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Thanks to this torch the Navy divers will be able in 1927 to intervene effectively in the refloating work of another submarine the S-4, in which no less than 564 dives of any kinds will be realized (129).

In France in 1924, the Société de la Soudure Autonome Française resumes under the direction of Mr. Lebrun the essays of oxy-electric cutting she had interrupted in 1917 and on June 10, a diver managed using a coated iron tube (4mm inside diameter and 8 mm outer diameter and 80 cm length) to cut a sheet steel section of 20 mm in thickness thanks to a series of contiguous holes (130).

The literature does not specify the type of coating, but it's a safe bet that it was adhesive tape because it (the coating) protected the cutters who worked barehanded from the effects of the alternating current (130). Given the success of the trials it was this technique which was going to be used a few days later to continue the cutting tests on the Tubantia which we remember had been interrupted following the explosion of the flexible hoses (see article 2).

This time a diver managed thanks to 6 iron electrodes to cut a length of 1.2 meters plate in one hour of time. The straightness of the cut had been assured thanks to the implementation of a wooden guide painted in white (130).

As shown, the electrodes used during the French trials were in iron and not in carbon but it is nevertheless this last type of prismatic electrode 30 cm long breakthrough by 2 holes for the arrival of oxygen that will continue to be used by European diving companies into the forties.

By 1932 another cutting method by means of electrode 8 to 10 mm in diameter (without oxygen) will be developed by Mr. Sarrazin but it will be very little applied because its implementation required an operating current of about 1000 amps (131).

In 1935 Siebe-Gorman also describes an oxy-arc torch in its manual. As we can see on the photo 67 it is also a linear shape.

Photo n° 67: Siebe-Gorman oxy-arc torch (132)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

In 1939 the American Swafford applies for a patent for a new torch but it seems that this model was never marketed.

Figure n° 29: Sketch of the Swafford oxy-arc torch (133)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

On the other hand, towards the same time the same Mr. Swafford also manufactures a cutting electrode composed of a brass tube of Ø 9,5 x 350 mm in which are either welded a small square electrode or 3 steel rods. In order to be properly insulated the electrode it is protected by 3-5 wraps of insulating tape.

This electrode that now contains 7 steel rods will be in service for a few years in the US Navy and will still be mentioned in the various Manuals until 1948.

Figure n° 30: Sketch of the Swafford electrode (134)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

It will be necessary to wait until 1940 to see a real evolution in the design of electric cutting.

At that time the department of the United States Navy decided to adapt existing materials in the need for the time. The modernization of this equipment will be realized at the US Naval Engineering Experimental Station located in Annapolis, Maryland and the material will then be tested by the Experimental Diving Unit and Deep Sea Diving School in Washington as well as at the US Naval Training School located at Pier 88 in New York.

It is moreover this number of quay that will give its name to this new oxy-arc torch.

Photo n° 68: The Pier 88 cutting torch (135)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

From that time also the big carbon electrodes are gradually going to disappear in favour of new finer tubular electrodes.

Two new types of hollow electrode will then be available: The ceramic electrodes and the steel tubular electrodes covered with a coating.

Photo n° 69: Models of electrode (136)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

With this new equipment, the American divers are going to be able to work more effectively on the diverse ships which were sunk by Japanese aircraft. At Pearl Harbor, not less than 20,000 hours of diving will be needed to refloat most ships among which numerous hours were dedicated to cutting (137).

What is extremely surprising is that since the advent of electric cutting until the late forties a lot of cutting was also made with alternating current. In spite of the inconveniences and the risks of this type of electric supply the only additional precaution that were taken by the divers with regard to direct current consisted to better insulate the inside of the helmet by covering for example all metal parts which might to touched (139 ).

What is on the other hand to notice is that from the very beginning, it was recommended to turn off the electric current during cutting stops and changes of electrodes (see Chapman and all patent process).

In Europe also the oxy-arc cutting begins to get modernized after the Second World War. If England and to a lesser extent in Italy they continue to favour the use of carbon electrodes until the late sixties.

Photo n° 70: Siebe-Gorman cutting set (140)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Photo N° 71: Diver using an Italian torch (141)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

In France, Belgium and possibly other countries we begin on the other hand to quickly use the steel tubular electrodes "Oxycuttend" manufactured by the company Arcos and the pink electrodes of Craftsweld. These two cutting rods were covered with a rutile coating which had the advantage to generate an extremely stable arc.

On the other hand this coating degraded rather quickly in the water and it was therefore better to protect the electrodes with insulating tape. To avoid this inconvenience Arcair launches on the market in 1971 the SEA-CUT.1, an electrode composed of a mixture of carbon and graphite which does not contain more than a simple plastic coating.

Photo n° 72: SOGETRAM diver doing some cutting training (142)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Each type of electrodes available had good cutting performance, but also some disadvantages. The big advantage of the carbon and the ceramic electrodes was their burning time which was generally 10 times higher than that of steel electrodes (143). They were also a little shorter what facilitated the work in confined spaces. On the other hand these electrodes broke very easily and the kerfs were rather narrow. Thereby they become less efficient than the plates became greater than 19 mm.

In the years that followed various oxy-arc cutting torches will be marketed everywhere (ARCOS, BECKMAN, CRAFTSWELD, ARCAIR, BROCO).

All are equal in quality if used and maintained properly.

Figure n° 31: Sketch of the Craftsweld torch (144)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Photo n° 73: Beckman cutting torch (145)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Photo n° 74: Russian cutting torch (146)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Between 1975 and 1978, basing probably on the principle of the thermal lance cutting (see below) as well as on what Swafford had invented in 1939, the Broco Company is developing the first ultra-thermic electrodes.

These are constituted by a fine steel tube 0.7 mm in thickness in which are crimped 7 metal wires of Ø 2.4 mm. Among these one is in a different alloy which allows the maintaining of an exothermic reaction after the cut of the electric current.

Photo n° 75: Electrodes Broco (147)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

This electrode has a number of advantages compared with the steel tubular electrode such as that of requiring only a low intensity current (150 Amps) to work and thus a less heavy generator can be set up on construction sites.

Another undeniable advantage of this type of electrode is due to the fact that thanks to her exothermic reaction it can cut a larger number of materials that are oxidizing or not.

Its implementation is also easier because thanks to the fact that she can burn almost any material the cleaning of the surface to be cut needs no longer be as neat and finally learning how to use it is easier than that of cutting with steel tubular rods.

As a result, this type of ultra-thermic electrodes is fast going to dominate the market and its principle will rapidly be adopted or copied by other manufacturers or even private entrepreneurs who are going to produce in their turn this type of electrodes (Comex pro, Magnumusa, Divex, Arcair, HBS and many others).

Photo n° 76: Cutting with an ultra-thermic electrode (148)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

As mentioned a little earlier, the inventors of this new ultra-thermic electrode were probably inspired by another process of cutting: The thermal lance.

It consists of a steel tube of about 3 meters long with diameters ranging from 13 to 21 mm packed with alloy steel rods. It was invented in the 1930s by the French company Air Liquide, which was itself based on the invention of Ernst Menne German who in 1901 developed an oxygen lance for opening furnace taps in steel blast furnaces (149).

Thanks to its high combustion temperature thermal lance can pierce virtually any type of material. Regarding its use in water, it begins just after the Second World War where it is mainly implemented to create boreholes in the cement or the concrete that filled the holds of some wrecks.

By 1968 the American Marine discovers that this type of oxy-lance is used in Europe and thinks that the process could be used in some salvage operation and therefore asks the Battelle Memorial Institute to conduct an investigation on the risks incurred by the divers (150).

The result of the study was clear: process too dangerous to be used under water because of the high risks of explosion.

Despite these risks, certain diving company will nevertheless use the thermal lance in the end of the 70s for the opening of cavities in the reinforced concrete structures of some offshore platforms (151).

Currently, the thermal lance does not seem to be more used than by small companies not always aware of the risks or for the cutting of big piece when no other cutting mode is possible.

Picture n° 77: Cutting of a pipeline using a thermic lance (152)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

It is then the turn of Reginald Clucas to arrive on the market with a new product.

Probably that this one has in the circle of acquaintances divers who told him about the underwater electric cutting and limitations bound to the electrode burning time. He imagines therefore a system that will allow divers to cut much longer without having to continually change rods and which is also less bulky than long thermal lances.

As a result, in 1968 he launches on the professional diving market a thermic cutting cable for whom he is going to borrow the first name of his daughter Kerie (153).

Photo n° 78: Kerie Cable reel (154)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

The operating principle of the Kerie cable is similar to the thermal lance but contrary to the metallic tubes containing alloy threats, the system consists of an outer sheath of plastic material in which a plurality of multistrand high carbon steel wires forming a hollow core to allow the passage of oxygen are set.

The ignition of the cable is done either by means of a torch flame or electrically with a current of 12 volts. The cables are supplied in lengths of 15 and 30 meters and in three dimensions 6, 9 and 12 mm

Figure n°32: Principle of implementation of the Kerie cable (155)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Photo N°: 79: Kerie Cable Set (156)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

The burn rate is about 60 cm per minute what gives it a burning time of approximately 50 and 25 minutes by cable.

Although its principle of operation resembles that of the thermal lance, its melting temperature is however much lower (2700 °) what only makes possible that the cutting of ferrous metals.

One big problem with this cable (especially the first generation) was due to the fact that sometimes the plastic sheath was consumed faster than the metal core of the cable which was particularly annoying during cuttings without visibility and more than one diver did burn his hand.

Photo n° 80: Defect of functioning (157)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

This is probably one of the reasons why this system has never really breakthrough and somewhat fell in oblivion for nearly 3 decades. Today, this problem appears to have been solved and the new system seems to be adopted by several navies and companies.

Photo n° 81: Diver using the Kerie cable (158)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

In 2004 we see the arriving of the Swordfish rod from the Speciality Welds society (159).

This new electrode with a high content of iron oxide sold in diameter of 4 mm and 5 resumes the principle of the metal-arc cutting method (without supply of oxygen) used during the early electrical cuttings that is to say that the steel is not oxidized by an oxygen jet but is simply melted by the heat of an arc of about 400 amperes.

Photo N° 82: Result of a Swordfish cutting (160)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

The latest thermal cutting method at disposition of the divers is that of the plasma arc.

Photo n° 83: Plasma arc torch and its control panel (161)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

It was developed in the fifties but at that time it is not yet widely used because of some double arcing phenomena that damaged the electrode and cutting nozzle and it will be necessary to wait from then on until 1963 to see a real start in the surface cutting (162).

Fairly quickly the French company SOGETRAM discovers this process and decides to test it in the dive pool on Garenne sur Eure. The trials will however be quickly stopped because the vibrations and explosions generated by the tool during the cutting sequences were such that the staff feared the breaking of the portholes (163).

It will then be necessary to wait until 1985 to see the underwater arc plasma reappear in the former Soviet Union where this technique will be used together with the oxy-arc on the cutting job of the tanker Ludwig Svoboda that exploded in the port of Ventspils (164).

Photo n° 84: Wreck of the Ludwig Svoboda (165)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

One of the problems of the implementation of the underwater arc plasma is bound to the fact that this process runs at 120-200 V arc voltage and has an open circuit voltage of 250-400 V what exceeds very widely the 30 volts recommended by most regulations (166).

Nevertheless from the beginning of this 21nth century the British company Air Plasma Ltd decides to adapt one of their systems for under water use and managed to eliminate electrical hazards for the divers. Their torch will be used the first time in March 2005 on a project of Mermaid Offshore Services in South Korea on which the divers will cut a series of holes of varied shapes and sizes in a steel sheet 32 mm located at the base of a platform (167).

The same torch will also be used in Canada in 2006 for the underwater cutting of 1500 m of sheet piles (168) and more recently in the United Kingdom to that of a curtain of about 800 m (169). Unfortunately no feedback is available concerning the possible difficulties met during the cutting of the locks and therefore it is a safe bet that only flat parts have been cut by the torch.

One of the advantages of the plasma arc is that the cutting generates relatively little debris and thus this cutting method is also used in nuclear power plants for the dismantling of some submerged structures. In most cases, the torch is remotely manipulated from the surface, but recently the divers of an American company specialized in this type of works cut out all the internal components from four steam generators (170).

Photo n° 85: Cutting trial with the underwater plasma torch (171)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

But apart from these few particular applications there are very little echo’s concerning other types of underwater cutting work using this method.

Conclusions:

As we have seen through these five articles, as well as through the information of Figure n° 33 which represents the cutting speeds achieved during some tests performed in December 1940, the various tools were relatively productive and allowed to perform tasks that without them would have been impossible to make.

Figure n° 33: Length of cut made in 12 minutes using various cutting processes (172)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Today because of its ease of learning one favourites especially the cutting with ultra-thermic rods. Yet in the point of view of cutting speed per hour, if we except the plasma arc which is currently only used for specific applications and can cut the rate of 3 cm / sec (108 m / h) (173), the undisputed champion for most cutting operations in civil engineering still remains the underwater gas burning torch because used in good conditions and by some competent diver it can reach the speed of 66 m / h (174). It is followed rather far by the oxy-arc cutting (30,5 m / h) (175) and the ultra-thermic cutting (24,5 m / h) (176).

Referring to Figure 33, it is surprising to notice that the cutting speed mentioned for the oxy-hydrogen cutting is so low (7.5 m / h) as it does not correspond to the reality of the time when speeds were rather situated around 36 m / h (177).

It is therefore likely that this test was realized by a diver non-specialized in this type of cutting.

Figure n°34: Extrapolation Figure n° 33 to current performance (174 ,175, 176)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

Despite the efficiency of these tools it is clear that both in civil engineering and offshore, thermal cutting operations have greatly diminished.

This is due to several reasons. On shore where these tools were primarily used for cutting of sheet piling it is partly due to the fact that first the steel prices increased sharply and secondly powerful hydraulic extracting tools were created during these last years which have therefore allowed the removal of the piles in their entirety.

In offshore, this mode of cutting also tends to be replaced by methods less risky for divers. Indeed, regardless of the method that is used it always generates a more or less large quantity of highly explosive gas which if they are confined in an enclosed area near the cutting area may explode violently under pulse of incandescent slag.

Photo n° 86: Diving helmet having suffered the effects of an UW explosion associated with cutting (178)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 5)

This risk is moreover very real because since the invention of the first underwater torch dozen of divers have unfortunately lost their lives by cutting (179).

The problem is that because of this decrease of cutting work the experience is lost and the new divers hardly have the opportunity to practice.

Even in the commercial diving schools this technique is often approached only in a succinct way by teachers who themselves do not always properly master this process. Yet an effort should be made in improving this teaching because even if less used it is almost certain that during still quite some years thermal cutting will remain a valuable tool for the diver.

References:

(115) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 22

(116) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 228

(117) Popular Mechanics Magazine Aug. 1934 page 164

(118) http://www.google.com/patents/US1324337

(119) RALPH E. CHAPMAN, OF MIAMI, FLORIDA. APPARATUS Fon. CUTTING on WELDING METAL. Application ñled October 9, 1925.` Serial No. 61,391.

(120) Popular Science Nov.1932 page 52

(121) Popular Mechanics Magazine May 1922 page 682

(122) Pacific Marine Review 1919 page 598

(123) Pacific Marine Review 1922 page 338

(124) Pacific Marine Review 1922 page 338

(125) Popular Mechanics Magazine May 1922 page 682

(126) Engineering news-record vol 90, n°10 march 8 1923 page 454

(127) Engineering news-record vol 90, n°10 march 8 1923 page 454

(128) http://paris-tx-naacp.blogspot.be/2011_08_01_archive.html

(129) Marine Salvage by Joseph N. Gores 1972 David & Charles page 119-123

(130) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 23-24

(131) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 30

(132) The Historical Diving Society Italia hds_48 pdf page 9

(133) http://www.google.com/patents/US2210640

(134) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California fig.17

(135) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California fig.10

(136) Underwater Work by Cayford Cornell Maritime Press 1966 page 93

(137) Marine Salvage by Joseph N. Gores 1972 David & Charles page 299-300

(138) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 30

(139) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 30

(140) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 228

(141) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201906456641309&set=g.168828609978762&type=1&theater

(142) Brochure Sogetram

(143) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California section 16

(144) https://www.google.com/patents/US2417650

(145) Commercial Oil-Field Diving by N.B. Zinkowski CMP 1971 page 170

(146) http://shelfspb.ru/upload/structure_1/1/1/6/structure_116/structure_property_image_83.jpg

(147) http://images.marinetechnologynews.com/images/maritime/w400/image-broco-underwater-22265.jpg

(148) https://www.facebook.com/kirby.morgan.apparel/photos/a.312480892127738.68021.288917144484113/1074685842573902/?type=3&theater

(149) http://www.saimm.co.za/Conferences/FurnaceTapping/203-Dienenthal.pdf

(150) Characteristics of Burning Bars Important to Their Being Used for Underwater Salvage Operations G.H. Alexander (Batelle Memorial Institute) Offshore Technology Conference 1969

(151) Anciens de Comex group memories of MCP 01 concrete cutting

(152) https://www.facebook.com/deivis.villalobos.9/videos/10207700185759910/

(153) http://www.google.ch/patents/US3591758

(154) https://www.ohgtech.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_5359-500x500.jpg

(155) U.S.Navy Salvage Manual Volume 1 Strandings, Harbor Clearance and Afloat Salvage Revision 2 2013 Published by Direction of Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command page 301

(156) NAVY EXPERIMENTAL DIVING UNIT REPORT NO. 7-84 EVALUATION OF THE KERIE CABLE THERMAL ARC CUTTING EQUIPMENT SUSAN J. TRUKKEN JULY 1984/ DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVY EXPERIMENTAL DIVING UNIT PANAMA CITY. FLORIDA 32407 page 9

(157) Experimental Diving Unit Report 24-72 / Evaluation of the Thermo-Jet cutting Torch by LTJ G B. LEBENSON, USNR and HTL.J.SCHLEGEL, USN/ Navy Experimental Diving Unit Washington Navy Yard 1973 page 11

(158) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Underwater_Kerie_cable.jpg

(159) http://www.specialwelds.com/products/swordfish.asp

(160) http://www.specialwelds.com/videos/swordfish-1.htm

(161) F.Hermans personal photo from plasma cutting test at BDC in Sept. 2012

(162) http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=1061#_Conventional_Plasma_Arc

(163) Information anciens de Sogetram (Pierre Graves et Felix Cobos)

(164) http://www.asptr.lv/en/performed-works.html

(165) http://www.asptr.lv/en/performed-works.html

(166) Code of Practice for The Safe Use of Electricity Under Water IMCA 045 page 22

(167) http://www.air-plasma.com/P30u.htm

(168) http://www.air-plasma.com/P30u.htm

(169) http://www.miles-water.com/underwater-plasma-cutting.html

(170) The Use of Divers for the Internal Underwater Segmentation of Steam Generators to Support Decommissioning - 14033 Charles A. Vallance (USA) Underwater Engineering Services, Inc.

(171) F.Hermans personal photo from plasma cutting test at BDC in Sept. 2012

(172) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California section 17 Plate 2

(173) F.Hermans personal data from plasma cutting test at BDC in Sept. 2012

(174) F. Hermans log book 3 April 1980 Zeebrugge 16,5 m vertical cut in sheetpile in 15 minutes.

(175) F. Hermans log book 17 April 1981 G.O.M cutting of a 20” pipe in 3 minutes.

(176) F. Hermans log book 10 May 1991 Cameroun cutting of a 24” conductor pipe in 5 minutes.

(177) http://www.historicdiving.com/index.php/my-portfolio/videos/item/883-welding-under-water-video

(178) Evaluation Report of Swordfish Iron Oxide Cutting Electrode Shell April 2004 page 16

(179) http://www.thediversassociation.com/index.php/sheets incidents list and news paper achives

7 avril 2016 4 07 /04 /avril /2016 10:33
HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Bonjour à tous,

Pour ceux qui le souhaites vous pouvez maintenant télécharger et imprimer “La petite histoire du découpage sous eau “ dans son entièreté à: https://www.academia.edu/24940668/La_Petite_Histoire_du_D%C3%A9coupage_Sous_Eau

La deuxième méthode de découpage sous eau à avoir vu le jour utilise le principe du soudage à l’arc. Là également, cette invention est due au génie de quelques grands hommes. Le premier n’est autre que le physicien anglais sir Humphry David (le cousin d’Edmund) qui en 1813 parvint à créer un arc électrique sous eau.

Il faudra ensuite attendre jusqu’en 1890 pour voir apparaitre le dépôt d’un premier brevet pour un procédé de soudage à l’arc.

Le problème c’est que ce premier procédé utilise des électrodes nues sans enrobage et donc l’arc est très instable et les soudures de piètres qualités.

Heureusement dix ans plus tard les premières électrodes enrobées sont inventée permettant ainsi la réalisation des premiers travaux de soudage à l’arc.

Très rapidement au cours de ces travaux les ouvriers soudeurs vont se rendre compte qu’en augmentant l’intensité du courant électrique il était alors possible de découper ou plutôt de faire fondre des tôles de faible épaisseur. Pourtant, il faudra encore attendre jusqu’au milieu de la première guerre mondiale pour qu’on songe à utiliser ce procédé sous eau.

Les premiers essais de découpage sous eau à l’électrode pleine (électrode de soudage) semblent avoir débuté simultanément en France, au Royaume-Uni et aux Etats –Unis.

En France des essais sous eau sont réalisé en 1917 par la société de la Soudure Autogène Française avec deux types d’électrode : Electrodes en acier pour les petits diamètres et électrodes en carbone pour les gros diamètres. Mais les générateurs électriques utilisés ne sont pas assez puissant et les tests sont non probants. Résultat, côté français les essais de découpage électrique ne reprendront pas avant 1924 (115).

L’amirauté britannique semble avoir eu plus de succès avec ce procédé puisque le Deep Diving and Submarine Operations de Siebe-gorman mentionne que ses scaphandriers l’utilisèrent durant la première guerre mondiale (116).

Côté américain c’est à la firme Meritt-Chapman & Scott que revient l’honneur d’avoir développé ce système qui va d’ailleurs être utilisé le S.S St Paul en complément du chalumeau.

Photo n° 60 : Scaphandrier avec torche de découpage (117)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Dès juin 1918 R.E. Chapman et J.W. Kirk dépose un brevet pour une méthode de découpage sous eau à l’aide de l’intensité d’un arc électrique. Pour cela, les inventeurs prévoient 2 façons de découper l’acier. 1° à l’aide de la seule chaleur produite par l’arc électrique d’une électrode au carbone, 2° à l’aide d’une électrode au carbone percée de 3 trous permettant l’envoi d’oxygène ou au contraire en envoyant de l’oxygène par l’intermédiaire de 2 petites tubulures.

Figure n° 26 : Schéma procédé (118)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Dans la pratique on verra plus tard que seule l’utilisation d’électrode creuse sera privilégié.

Ce brevet sera suivi un peu plus tard par un autre également déposé par Chapman et qui concerne cette fois la torche de découpage électrique qui est utilisé par ses scaphandriers.

Figure n° 27 : Schéma pince de découpage (119)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Photo n° 61 : Pince de découpage oxy-arc (120)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Afin de former ses ouvriers à cette nouvelle technique une cuve d’entrainement est installée au sein de l’entreprise et très rapidement les scaphandriers vont adopter cette technique pour réaliser certains découpages difficiles.

Photo n° 62 : Matériel de découpage et cuve d’entrainement Meritt-Chapman & Scott (121)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Une des toutes premières utilisations pratiques se fera en 1919 sur le cargo Lord Dufferin. Celui-ci était entré en collision avec le paquebot AQUITANIA et pour éviter qu’il ne sombre, le bateau avait été échoué sur l’ile de la statue de la Liberté.

Environ une vingtaine de mètres de sa poupe avait été en partie arraché et afin de permettre sa mise en cale sèche, les scaphandriers avait dû découper à l’oxy-arc environ 8 tonnes de tôles froissées.

Photo n° 63 : Lord Dufferin en cale sèche (122)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Une autre super prestation réalisée par les gars de cette entreprise eut lieu à New York en février 1922. A cette époque une drague avait accidentellement percé une conduite d’eau potable de 36 pouces alimentant Stade Island l’un des arrondissements de New-York.

Photo n° 64 : Entrainement au découpage (123)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

La réparation prévoyait de retirer la section endommagée et de la remplacer par une manchette en acier. Plusieurs jours de travail furent nécessaires pour dégager la partie endommagée de la conduite qui reposait sous une épaisse couche de vase et permettre ainsi aux scaphandriers de commencer le découpage.

Mais le travail n’est pas simple car malgré le dévasement certaines sections du tube devront être découpée de l’intérieur ce qui on peut l’imaginer était loin d’être confortable avec un Mark V sur la tête.

De plus, la conduite était en fonte donc difficilement oxydable et les épaisseurs variaient de 30 à 80 mm. Malgré ces difficultés les scaphandriers arriveront finalement à bout de ce travail au bout de 9 jours durant lesquels ils auront plongé 24h/24h et découpé pas moins de 10 mètres linéaire de conduite (124).

Photo n° 65 : Enlèvement de la section endommagée (125)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Et pour terminer on peut encore mentionner le découpage réalisé par John Tooker dans des conditions également difficile d’une trentaine de palplanches protégeant l’une des piles du pont Texas sur la rivière Atchafalaya à Melville et qui avaient été arrachées et tordues par une grande estacade en bois partie à la dérive.

Figure n° 28 : Détail du rideau de palplanches (126)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

L’ensemble des travaux qui avait débuté le 17 novembre 1922 avait nécessité 114 h de plongée dont 67 h furent exclusivement consacrée au découpage (127).

Prenant à son tour conscience des capacités de cet outil de découpage électrique l’US Navy va elle aussi développer une première pince de découpage oxy-arc. Contrairement à la pince de Chapman et Kirch qui rappelons-le est rectiligne, celle de la marine américaine est à angle droit et permet de travailler avec une électrode à 90°.

Parmi les personnes ayant participé à cette conception et à son perfectionnement on retrouve notamment le sous-officier John Henri « Dick »Turpin qui fut l’un des tout premiers scaphandriers noirs de la marine.

Photo n° 66 : Le scaphandrier J.H. Turpin (128)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

En 1927, les scaphandriers de la marine vont grâce à cette torche pouvoir intervenir efficacement lors des travaux de renflouement d’un autre sous-marin le S-4 au cours duquel pas moins de 564 plongées en tous genres seront réalisées (129).

En France, la Société de la Soudure Autonome Française reprend en 1924 sous la direction de Monsieur Lebrun ses essais de découpage oxy-électrique qu’elle avait interrompus en 1917 et le 10 juin un scaphandrier réussi en utilisant un tube de fer enrobé de 4 mm de diamètre intérieur et 8 mm de diamètre extérieur et de 80 cm de longueur à couper une section de tôle de 20 mm d’épaisseur grâce à une série de trous jointifs (130).

La littérature ne précise pas le type d’enrobage, mais il y a fort à parier qu’il s’agissait de chatterton car il (l’enrobage) protégeait les découpeurs qui travaillaient à mains nues des effets du courant alternatif (130).

Vu la réussite cette fois des essais ce fut cette technique qui allait être utilisée quelques jours plus tard pour continuer les tests de découpage sur le Tubantia qui rappelons le avaient été interrompu suite à l’explosion des flexibles du chalumeau (voir article n° 2).

Cette fois un scaphandrier réussi grâce à 6 électrodes en fer à découper une longueur de 1,2 mètres de tôle en une heure de temps. La rectitude de la coupe avait été assurée grâce à la mise en place d’un guide en bois peint en blanc (130).

Comme on le constate, les électrodes utilisées au cours des ces essais français sont en fer et non en carbone mais c’est pourtant ce dernier type d’électrode prismatique de 30 cm de long percée de 2 tous pour l’arrivée d’oxygène qui continuera à être utilisé par les entreprises de plongée européennes jusque dans les années quarante.

Vers 1932 un autre procédé de découpage à l’aide d’électrode pleine de 8 à 10 mm de diamètre (sans apport d’oxygène) sera mis au point par Monsieur SARRAZIN. Mais il ne sera que très peu appliqué car sa mise en œuvre demandait une intensité de fonctionnement d’environ 1000 Ampères (131).

En 1935 Siebe-Gorman décrit également une pince oxy-arc dans son manuel. Comme on peut le voir sur la photo n° 67 celle-ci est également de forme rectiligne.

Photo n° 67 : Pince oxy-arc Siebe-Gorman (132)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

En 1939 l’américain Swafford dépose un brevet pour un nouveau modèle de pince mais il semblerait que ce modèle n’ait jamais été commercialisé.

Figure n° 29 : Schéma pince oxy-arc Swafford (133)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Par contre, vers la même époque ce même monsieur Swafford fabrique également une électrode de découpage composée d’un tube en laiton de Ø 9,5 x 350 mm dans lequel est soudée une petite électrode carré ou au contraire 3 baguettes en acier. Afin d’être correctement isolée l’électrode est protégée par 3 à 5 tours de tape isolant.

Cette électrode contenant cette fois 7 baguettes en acier sera en service durant quelques années dans l’US Navy et il en sera encore fait mention dans le Divers Manual de 1948.

Figure n° 30 : Schéma électrode Swafford (134)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Il faudra attendre 1940 pour voir une vraie évolution dans la conception du matériel de découpage électrique. A cette époque le département de la Marine Américaine décida d’adapter le matériel existant au besoin de l’époque. La modernisation de cet équipement sera réalisée à l’US Naval Engineering Experimental Station situé à Annapolis dans le Maryland et le matériel sera ensuite testé par l’Experimental Diving Unit and Deep Sea Diving School de Washington ainsi qu’à l’U.S Naval Training School située au Pier 88 de New York.

C’est d’ailleurs ce numéro de quai qui donnera son nom à cette nouvelle pince oxy-arc.

Photo n° 68 : La pince de découpage Pier 88 (135)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

A partir de cette époque également les grosses électrodes au carbone vont progressivement disparaitre au profit de nouvelles électrodes tubulaires plus fine.

Deux nouveaux types d’électrode creuse seront alors disponibles : Les électrodes en céramique et les électrodes tubulaires en acier recouvertes d’un enrobage rutile.

Photo n° 69 : Modèles d’électrode (136)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Grâce à ce nouvel équipement, les scaphandriers américains vont pouvoir travailler plus efficacement sur les divers navires qui ont été envoyé par le fond par l’aviation japonaise.

A Pearl Harbor, pas moins de 20000 heures de plongée seront nécessaires pour renflouer la plupart des navires dont de nombreuses heures consacrées au découpage (137).

Ce qui est extrêmement étonnant, c’est que depuis l’avènement du découpage électrique jusqu’à la fin des années quarante bon nombre de découpage se faisait également avec du courant alternatif. Malgré les inconvénients et les risques de ce type de courant la seule précaution supplémentaire que prenaient les scaphandriers par rapport au courant continu consistait à mieux isoler l’intérieur du casque en recouvrant par exemple toutes les parties métalliques qui étaient susceptible d’être touchées (139).

Ce qui est par contre intéressant de constater, c’est que dès la première heure, il était conseillé que couper le courant électrique lors des arrêts et des changements d’électrodes (voir brevet procédé Chapman and all).

En Europe également le découpage oxy-arc commence à se moderniser après la seconde guerre mondiale.

Si en Angleterre et dans une moindre mesure en Italie on continue à privilégier l’utilisation des électrodes au carbone jusqu’à la fin des années soixante.

Photo n° 70 : Ensemble de découpage Siebe-Gorman (140)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Photo n° 71 : Scaphandrier utilisant une pince de découpage italienne(141)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

En France, Belgique et probablement d’autres pays on commence par contre à très rapidement utiliser les électrodes tubulaires en acier « Oxycuttend » fabriquées par la société Arcos et les électrodes roses de Craftsweld. Ces deux baguettes de découpage étaient recouverte d’un enrobage rutile qui avait l’avantage de générer un arc électrique extrêmement stable.

Par contre cet enrobage se dégradait assez rapidement dans l’eau et il était dès lors préférable de le protéger par du tape isolant.

Pour éviter cet inconvénient Arcair met sur le marché dès 1971 la SEA-CUT.1, une électrode composée d’un mélange de carbone et de graphite et qui ne comporte plus qu’une simple protection isolante à base de plastique.

Photo n° 72 : Plongeur-scaphandrier de la Sogétram s’entrainant au découpage (142)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Chaque type d’électrodes avait de bonnes performances de découpage mais également quelques inconvénients.

Le gros avantage des électrodes au carbone ou en céramique était leur durée de combustion qui était généralement 10 fois supérieurs à celui des électrodes en acier (143).

Elles étaient également un peu plus courte ce qui facilitait le travail en espace confiné.

Par contre, ces électrodes se cassaient très facilement et les saignées de coupe étaient assez étroites et de ce fait elles devenaient moins performantes des que les tôles devenaient supérieures à 19 mm.

Au cours des années qui suivent diverses pinces (torches) de découpage oxy-arc vont être commercialisées un peu partout (ARCOS, BECKMAN, CRAFTSWELD, ARCAIR, BROCO).

Toutes se valent si elles sont utilisées et entretenues correctement.

Figure n° 31 : Schéma brevet de la torche Craftsweld (144)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Photo n° 73 : Pince de découpage Beckman (145)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Photo n° 74 : Pince de découpage russe (146)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Entre 1975 et 1978 se basant sans doute sur le principe du découpage à la lance thermique (voir plus loin) ainsi que sur ce qu’avait inventé Swafford en 1939, la société Broco met au point les premières électrodes ultra-thermiques.

Celles-ci sont constituées d’un fin tube en acier de 0,7 mm d’épaisseur dans lequel sont serties 7 fils métalliques de Ø 2,4 mm dont l’un en alliage différent permet de maintenir la réaction exothermique même après la coupure du courant électrique.

Photo n° 75 : Electrodes Broco (147)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Cette électrode présente un certain nombre d’avantage par rapport à l’électrode oxy-arc comme par exemple celui de ne nécessiter qu’un courant de faible intensité (150 Amps) pour fonctionner et donc des groupes électrogènes moins lourds peuvent être mis en place sur les chantiers.

Un autre avantage indéniable de ce type d’électrode tiens au fait que grâce à sa réaction exothermique elle est capable de découper un grand nombre de matériaux qu’ils soient oxydables ou pas. Sa mise en œuvre est également plus facile car grâce au fait qu’elle peut bruler quasi n’importe quel matériau le nettoyage des surfaces à découper ne devra plus être aussi soigné et enfin l’apprentissage de sa mise en œuvre est également plus facile que celui de l’oxy-arc. Résultat, ce type de baguette ultra-thermique va vite dominer le marché et son principe va rapidement être adopté ou copié par d’autres fabricants ou même des entrepreneurs privés qui vont à leur tour produire ce type d’électrodes (Comex pro, Magnumusa, Divex, Arcair, HBS et bien d’autres).

Photo n° 76 : Découpage à l’électrode ultra-thermique (148)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Comme signalé un peu plus haut, les inventeurs de cette nouvelle électrode ultra-thermique se sont probablement inspirés d’un autre procédé de découpage terrestre : La lance thermique. Celle-ci est constituée d’un tube en acier d’environ 3 mètres de long dont le diamètre varie de 13 à 21 mm et dont l’intérieur contient un faisceau de fils d'alliage à base de fer serrés les uns contre les autres.

Elle a été inventée dans les années 1930 par la firme française Air Liquide qui c’était elle-même basée sur l’invention de l’Allemand Ernst Menne qui avait en 1901 mis au point une lance à oxygène pour déboucher les trous de coulée du métal dans les haut-fourneaux (149).

Grâce à sa température de combustion élevée la lance thermique peut pratiquement percer n’importe quel type de matériaux.

En ce qui concerne son utilisation sous eau, elle commence un peu après la seconde guerre mondiale où elle est principalement mise en œuvre pour créer des trous de mine dans le ciment ou le béton qui bourrait les cales de certaines épaves.

Vers 1968 la Marine Américaine découvre que ce type de lance est utilisée en Europe et pense que le procédé pourrait être utilisé dans certaine opération de renflouement. Dès lors elle demande au Batelle Memorial Institute de faire une enquête sur les risques encourus par les plongeurs (150).

Le résultat de l’étude fut sans appel : Procédé bien trop dangereux à utiliser sous eau à cause des risques élevés d’explosion.

Malgré ces risques, certaine entreprise de plongée profonde utiliseront malgré tout la lance thermique fin des années 70 pour le percement des alvéoles en béton armée de certaines plateformes offshores (151).

Actuellement, la lance thermique ne semble plus être utilisée que par de petites entreprises pas toujours au courant des risques encourus ou pour le découpage de grosse pièce lorsqu’ aucun autre mode de découpage n’est possible.

Photo n° 77 : découpage d’un pipeline à l’aide d’une lance thermique (152)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

C’est ensuite au tour de Reginald Clucas d’arriver sur le marché avec un nouveau produit. Probablement que celui-ci a dans son entourage des scaphandriers qui lui ont parlé du découpage électrique sous eau et des limitations liés à ce type d’électrode.

Il imagine dès lors un système qui va permettre au plongeur de découper bien plus longtemps sans devoir continuellement changer de baguette et qui est également moins encombrant que les longues lances thermiques.

Résultat, en 1968 il met sur le marché de la plongée professionnelle un câble découpeur pour lequel il va emprunter le prénom de sa fille Kerie (153).

Photo n° 78 : Bobine de câble Kerie (154)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Le principe de fonctionnement du câble Kerie s’apparente à la lance thermique mais contrairement aux tubes métalliques contenant des fils d’alliage, le système se compose d’une gaine en plastique dans laquelle se trouve un câble en acier à forte teneur de carbone duquel l’âme centrale a été retirée afin de permettre le passage de l’oxygène.

L’allumage du câble se fait soit à l’aide de la flamme d’un chalumeau soit électriquement à l’aide d’un courant de 12 volts.

Les câbles sont fournis en longueur de 15 et 30 mètres et en trois dimensions 6, 9 et 12 mm.

Figure n° 32 : Principe de mise en œuvre du câble Kerie (155)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Photo n° 79 : Ensemble de mise en œuvre du câble Kerie (156)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Sa vitesse de combustion est d’environ 60 cm par minute ce qui lui donne une durée de combustion d’environ 50 et 25 minutes par câble.

Bien que son principe de fonctionnement ressemble à celui de la lance thermique, sa température de fusion est cependant bien plus basse (2700°) ce qui ne rend possible que le découpage de métaux ferreux.

Un des gros problèmes avec ce câble (surtout celui de première génération) était dû au fait que parfois la gaine plastique se consumait plus rapidement que l’âme métallique du câble ce qui était particulièrement gênant lors des découpages sans visibilité et plus d’un scaphandrier c’était à l’époque fait bruler la main.

Photo n° 80 : Défaut de fonctionnement (157)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

C’est probablement l’une des raisons pour laquelle ce système n’a jamais vraiment percée et est un peu tombé dans l’oubli durant près de 3 décennies. Aujourd’hui, ce problème parait avoir été supprimé et le système semble à nouveau être adopté par plusieurs marines et entreprises.

Photo 81 : Plongeur-scaphandrier utilisant le câble Kerie (158)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

En 2004 on voit arriver la Swordfish de la société Speciality Welds (159).

Cette nouvelle électrode à forte teneur d’oxyde de fer vendue en diamètre de 4 et 5 mm reprend le principe du découpage à l’arc sans apport d’oxygène utilisé lors des premiers découpages électriques c’est-à-dire que l’acier n’est pas oxydé par un jet d’oxygène mais est simplement fondu par la chaleur d’un arc électrique d’environ 400 Ampères.

Photo n° 82 : Résultat d’un test de découpage (160)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

La méthode de découpage thermique la plus récente mise à la disposition des scaphandriers est celle du plasma d’arc.

Photo n° 83 : Pince plasma arc et son panneau de contrôle (161)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Elle a vu le jour dans les années cinquante mais à cette époque elle n’est pas encore couramment utilisé à cause de certains phénomènes parasites qui endommagent l’électrode et la buse de coupe et il faudra dès lors attendre 1963 pour que le découpage en surface soit vraiment lancé (162).

Assez rapidement l’entreprise française SOGETRAM découvre ce procédé et décide de le tester dans sa piscine d’entrainement de Garenne sur Eure.

Les essais seront cependant vite arrêtés car lors des séquences de découpage les vibrations et les explosions générées par l’outil étaient telles que le personnel craignait la rupture des hublots d’observation (163).

Il faudra ensuite patienter jusqu’en 1985 pour voir le plasma d’arc réapparaitre dans l’ancienne Union Soviétique où cette technique sera utilisée conjointement avec l’oxy-arc lors des travaux de découpage du tanker Ludwig Svoboda qui avait explosé dans le port de Ventspils (164).

Photo n° 84 : Epave du Ludwig Svoboda (165)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Un des problèmes de la mise en œuvre du plasma d’arc sous eau est lié au fait que ce procédé fonctionne avec une tension d’arc et une tension à vide élevé qui sont respectivement de 120 - 200 Volts (ta) et 250 – 400 volts (tv) ce qui dépasse très largement les 30 volts préconisé par la plupart des règlementations (166).

Pourtant, dès le début de ce 21 nième siècle l’entreprise anglo-saxonne Air Plasma Ltd se décidera à son tour à mariniser un de ces ensembles de découpage de manière à éliminer les risques électriques pour les plongeurs-scaphandriers.

Leur torche sera utilisée une première fois en mars 2005 sur un chantier de Mermaid Offshore Services en Corée du sud au cours duquel les plongeurs-scaphandriers vont découper une séries de trous de formes et de dimensions variées dans une tôle d’acier de 32 mm située à la base d’une plateforme (167).

Cette même torche sera également utilisée au Canada en 2006 pour le recepage sous eau de 1500 m de palplanches (168) et plus récemment au royaume unis pour celui d’un rideau d’environ 800 mètres (169).

Malheureusement aucun retour n’est disponible concernant les éventuelles difficultés rencontrées dans la découpe des serrures mais il y a fort à parier que seules les parties planes auront été coupées par cette torche.

Un des avantages du plasma d’arc est qu’il génère relativement peu de débris et de ce fait ce procédé de découpage est également utilisé dans les centrales nucléaires pour le démantèlement de certaines structures immergées. Dans la plupart des cas, la torche est manipulée à distance depuis la surface, mais récemment les scaphandriers d’une entreprise américaine réputée dans ce type de travaux ont découpés tous les éléments internes d’un générateur de vapeur (170).

Photo n° 85 : Essai de découpage au plasma d’arc (171)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Mais en dehors de ces quelques applications particulières il n’y guère que très peu d’échos concernant d’autres types de travaux de découpage sous eau à l’aide de ce procédé.

Comme on a pu le constater au travers de ces cinq articles, ainsi qu’au travers de la figure n° 33 qui représente les vitesses de découpage obtenue lors de tests réalisé en décembre 1940, les divers outils énumérés étaient relativement performant et ont permis de réaliser des tâches qui sans eux aurait été impossible à faire.

Figure n° 33 : Longueur découpée en 12 minutes à l’aide de divers procédés de découpage (172)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Aujourd’hui à cause de sa facilité d’apprentissage on privilégie surtout le découpage à l’électrode ultra-thermique. Pourtant au point de vue vitesse de coupe à l’heure, si on excepte le plasma d’arc qui n’est actuellement utilisé que pour des applications spécifiques et qui permet de découper à la vitesse de 3 cm/sec (108 m/h) (173), le champion incontesté pour un grand nombre de découpage en travaux publiques reste encore toujours le chalumeau découpeur puisque utilisé dans de bonnes conditions et par quelqu’un de compétant peut atteindre sur tôle de 12 mm la vitesse de 66 m/h (174).

Il est suivi d’assez loin par le découpage par le découpage à l’arc (30,5 m/h)(175) et l’électrode ultra-thermique (24,5 m/h) (176).

Concernant la figure n°33 Il est surprenant de constater que la vitesse de découpage mentionnée pour le découpage oxy-hydrogène soit si faible (7,5 m/h) car cela ne correspond absolument pas à la réalité de l’époque où les vitesses se situaient plutôt autour de 36 m/h (177). Il est dès lors plus que probable que cet essai au chalumeau a été réalisé par un scaphandrier non spécialisé dans ce type de découpage.

Figure n° 34 : Extrapolation figure n° 33 aux performances actuelles (174,175,176)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Malgré l’efficacité de ces outils, force est de constater qu’aussi bien en travaux public ou en offshore les opérations de découpage thermique ont fortement diminuée.

Cela tient à plusieurs raisons. Dans les travaux public où ces outils était principalement utilisé pour le recépage des palplanches cela est dû en partie au fait que 1° le prix de l’acier à fortement augmentée et 2° des outils d’extractions hydrauliques puissants ont été créé au cours de ces dernières années ce qui a dès lors permit de retirer les palplanches dans leur entièreté.

En offshore, ce mode de découpage tend lui aussi à être remplacé par des méthodes présentant moins de risques pour les plongeurs-scaphandriers. En effet, quelques soit le procédé utilisé celui-ci génère toujours une quantité plus ou moins importante de gaz hautement explosif qui s’ils se confinent dans un espace clos à proximité de la zone de découpe risque d’exploser plus ou moins violemment sous l’impulsion d’une scorie incandescente.

Photo n° 86 : Casque de plongée ayant subi les effets d’une explosion liée au découpage (178)

HISTOIRE DU DECOUPAGE SOUS EAU (partie 5)

Ce risque est d’ailleurs bien réel car depuis l’invention du premier chalumeau sous-marin, plusieurs dizaines de scaphandriers ont malheureusement perdu la vie en découpant (179). L’ennui, c’est qu’à cause de cette diminution de travaux de découpage l’expérience se perd et les nouveaux plongeurs-scaphandriers n’ont plus guère l’occasion de se faire la main.

Même dans les écoles de plongée cette technique n’est bien souvent abordée que de manière succincte par des enseignants qui eux même ne maitrise pas toujours correctement ce procédé. Pourtant un effort devrait être fait dans l’amélioration de cet enseignement car même s’il est moins utilisé il est presque certain que durant encore pas mal d’année le découpage thermique restera un précieux outil pour le plongeur-scaphandrier.

Références:

(115) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 22

(116) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 228

(117) Popular Mechanics Magazine Aug. 1934 page 164

(118) http://www.google.com/patents/US1324337

(119) RALPH E. CHAPMAN, OF MIAMI, FLORIDA. APPARATUS Fon. CUTTING on WELDING METAL. Application ñled October 9, 1925.` Serial No. 61,391.

(120) Popular Science Nov.1932 page 52

(121) Popular Mechanics Magazine May 1922 page 682

(122) Pacific Marine Review 1919 page 598

(123) Pacific Marine Review 1922 page 338

(124) Pacific Marine Review 1922 page 338

(125) Popular Mechanics Magazine May 1922 page 682

(126) Engineering news-record vol 90, n°10 march 8 1923 page 454

(127) Engineering news-record vol 90, n°10 march 8 1923 page 454

(128) http://paris-tx-naacp.blogspot.be/2011_08_01_archive.html

(129) Marine Salvage by Joseph N. Gores 1972 David & Charles page 119-123

(130) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 23-24

(131) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 30

(132) The Historical Diving Society Italia hds_48 pdf page 9

(133) http://www.google.com/patents/US2210640

(134) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California fig.17

(135) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California fig.10

(136) Underwater Work by Cayford Cornell Maritime Press 1966 page 93

(137) Marine Salvage by Joseph N. Gores 1972 David & Charles page 299-300

(138) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 30

(139) L’emploi du chalumeau et de l’arc électrique dans les travaux sous-marins 1945 Académie de Marine par Maurice Lebrun page 30

(140) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 228

(141) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201906456641309&set=g.168828609978762&type=1&theater

(142) Brochure Sogetram

(143) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California section 16

(144) https://www.google.com/patents/US2417650

(145) Commercial Oil-Field Diving by N.B. Zinkowski CMP 1971 page 170

(146) http://shelfspb.ru/upload/structure_1/1/1/6/structure_116/structure_property_image_83.jpg

(147) http://images.marinetechnologynews.com/images/maritime/w400/image-broco-underwater-22265.jpg

(148) https://www.facebook.com/kirby.morgan.apparel/photos/a.312480892127738.68021.288917144484113/1074685842573902/?type=3&theater

(149) http://www.saimm.co.za/Conferences/FurnaceTapping/203-Dienenthal.pdf

(150) Characteristics of Burning Bars Important to Their Being Used for Underwater Salvage Operations G.H. Alexander (Batelle Memorial Institute) Offshore Technology Conference 1969

(151) Anciens de Comex group memories of MCP 01 concrete cutting

(152) https://www.facebook.com/deivis.villalobos.9/videos/10207700185759910/

(153) http://www.google.ch/patents/US3591758

(154) https://www.ohgtech.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/IMG_5359-500x500.jpg

(155) U.S.Navy Salvage Manual Volume 1 Strandings, Harbor Clearance and Afloat Salvage Revision 2 2013 Published by Direction of Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command page 301

(156) NAVY EXPERIMENTAL DIVING UNIT REPORT NO. 7-84 EVALUATION OF THE KERIE CABLE THERMAL ARC CUTTING EQUIPMENT SUSAN J. TRUKKEN JULY 1984/ DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVY EXPERIMENTAL DIVING UNIT PANAMA CITY. FLORIDA 32407 page 9

(157) Experimental Diving Unit Report 24-72 / Evaluation of the Thermo-Jet cutting Torch by LTJ G B. LEBENSON, USNR and HTL.J.SCHLEGEL, USN/ Navy Experimental Diving Unit Washington Navy Yard 1973 page 11

(158) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Underwater_Kerie_cable.jpg

(159) http://www.specialwelds.com/products/swordfish.asp

(160) http://www.specialwelds.com/videos/swordfish-1.htm

(161) F.Hermans personal photo from plasma cutting test at BDC in Sept. 2012

(162) http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=1061#_Conventional_Plasma_Arc

(163) Information anciens de Sogetram (Pierre Graves et Felix Cobos)

(164) http://www.asptr.lv/en/performed-works.html

(165) http://www.asptr.lv/en/performed-works.html

(166) Code of Practice for The Safe Use of Electricity Under Water IMCA 045 page 22

(167) http://www.air-plasma.com/P30u.htm

(168) http://www.air-plasma.com/P30u.htm

(169) http://www.miles-water.com/underwater-plasma-cutting.html

(170) The Use of Divers for the Internal Underwater Segmentation of Steam Generators to Support Decommissioning - 14033 Charles A. Vallance (USA) Underwater Engineering Services, Inc.

(171) F.Hermans personal photo from plasma cutting test at BDC in Sept. 2012

(172) Divers Manual 1948 US Navy Training School (Salvage) Navy Yard Annex Bayonne New Jersey/Reproduction by the Historical Diving Society USA Santa Barbara, California section 17 Plate 2

(173) F.Hermans personal data from plasma cutting test at BDC in Sept. 2012

(174) F. Hermans log book 3 April 1980 Zeebrugge 16,5 m vertical cut in sheetpile in 15 minutes.

(175) F. Hermans log book 17 April 1981 G.O.M cutting of a 20” pipe in 3 minutes.

(176) F. Hermans log book 10 May 1991 Cameroun cutting of a 24” conductor pipe in 5 minutes.

(177) http://www.historicdiving.com/index.php/my-portfolio/videos/item/883-welding-under-water-video

(178) Evaluation Report of Swordfish Iron Oxide Cutting Electrode Shell April 2004 page 16

(179) http://www.thediversassociation.com/index.php/sheets incidents list and news paper achives

24 mars 2016 4 24 /03 /mars /2016 13:47
Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Hi every one,

You can now download “The Little story of the Underwater Cutting” in one single printable document at: https://www.academia.edu/24883704/The_Little_Story_of_the_Underwater_Cutting

And with our English colleagues?

It is difficult to say who made the first underwater gas burning torch in England.

What is certain is that in 1919 two underwater oxyacetylene torches arrived in England following the acquisition by the Maritime Salvors LTD Company from New Haven of two salving vessels the Restorer and Reliant brought to the US Navy. The trademark of these torches is not clear but they were part of the equipment and items sold with boats (83).

In the early twenties, Siebe Gorman began designing an underwater cutting torch and to do so the firm decided to test several including the second generation Picard AD-8 cutting torch which was tested in November 1924

Photo n° 42: Cutting test with the 2nd generation Picard AD-8 torch in the Siebe Gorman tank in 1924 (84)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 43: Cutting test with the 2nd generation Picard AD-8 torch in the Siebe Gorman tank in 1924 (84)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n°44: Cutting test with the 2nd generation Picard AD-8 torch in the Siebe Gorman tank in 1924 (84)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Apparently the French torch seduced since the model they will create incorporates their principles that is to say, the combustion chamber and the pilot flame.

Figure n° 17: Sketch of the first Siebe Gorman underwater burning torch (85)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

In 1933 another oxy-hydrogen torch is marketed by the firm Underwater Cutters LTD (86) and in 1938, an article published in "The Electrical Journal" (87) mentions that this torch was used to cut 30 meters of sheet piles at 3 meters depth.

Photo n°45: Underwater Cutters LTD torch (88)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Figure n° 18: Underwater Cutters LTD arrangement (89)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Then comes the torch made by B.O.C & Siebe Gorman. It was a very powerful torch with which the diver could have a cutting speed of 60 cm per minute.

As can see from the photo n° 46, the company has removed the pilot flame and the combustion chamber she had used on her first torch and this time uses the principle of the air bubble as used on US torches.

A first mention of the use of this torch is reported in an article describing one of the most famous oxy-hydrogen cutting in history (90).

Photo 46: B.O.C & Siebe Gorman torch (91)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

This one takes place in 1944 on the British warship H.M.S Valiant. This battleship which was engaged in the battle against the Japanese fleet had suffered some damage that had forced her to go into dry dock in Ceylon, but following a false move during the dry setting the dry dock breaks and sinks.

Fortunately, the H.M.S Valiant remained afloat but during the sinking the end of the dock severely damaged one of her rudders two of her inner screws as well as the cast iron A frames holding them to the hull.

As there were no other dry dock installation likely to receive a vessel of this size in the Pacific it was decided to send her to Alexandria. Despite her damage, the battleship could still navigate but only at the reduced speed of 8 knots because the vibrations generated by the inertia of the two central propellers were enormous.

Arriving in the Suez Bay, Commander in Chief Sir John Cunningham called one of his good acquaintances the Lt Commander Peter Keeble, a salvage expert an experienced diver and asked him how to eliminate this problem. It's simple; Peter Keeble replied cut and drop the defective parts on the harbor floor.

Cunningham did not take long to decide and gave Keeble a week to perform this job (92).

Figure n°19: Stern of the H.M.S Valiant (93)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Him in turn contacted the petty officer Nichols another underwater work specialist, and between them they will undertake this cutting job which is far to be simple.

It must be said that the total weight of each items to be removed weighted around 26 tons.

During 2 days Nichols beefed up the existing torch and gave it an awesome strength. Then once ready he volunteered to do the first dive.

Sitting astride on the starboard shaft he began the cutting at 1.5 m from the gland. Four hours later he is forced to come to the surface because of a technical problem.

Then wanted to go down again despite a burned thumb but his chief took over and finally 6 hours later the first shaft was through.

A little bit too long we may think? Certainly not if we know that these shafts were 47 cm (18, 5 inches) in diameter.

It remained to cut the A frame that in section were 107 cm (42 inches) wide and 36 cm (14,5 inches) thick.

Nichols cut the first side of the port A frame in 4 hours.

Keeble cut the other side for about 70 cm (27 inches) and then stopped when he realized that the cut began widening. For security it was decided to cut the remainder of the metal with a plaster charge of 7.5 kg.

Bang! The entire starboard assemblage fell on the harbor bottom. It remained to do the same thing on the other propeller which took about the same time.

Figure n°20: Removal of the starboard side (94)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Finally thanks to the cutting the vibration completely disappeared and the dry docking wasn’t necessary anymore.

Figure n° 21: British Gas and Torch (95)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 47: B.G.T underwater torch equipment (96)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

As shown in Figure n° 21 a submarine oxyacetylene gas torch was also manufactured by the British Gas and Torch Company from Camberley but no reference is found regarding the date of manufacture.

1945 saw the arrival of the Seafire (97). It is a small oxy-hydrogen torch where the diameter of the mixing nozzle is reduced which has the advantage of using significantly less gas and makes it very convenient for small cutting jobs.

Photo n° 48: Seafire torch (98)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

The handle comprises two valves for the supply of the heating flame and a trigger for the cutting oxygen supply. The head is connected to the handle by 4 tubes. The top tube that leads the cutting oxygen, the lower tube the shield oxygen, the left tube the hydrogen fuel, and the right tube the heating oxygen.

Figure n°22: Seafire description (99)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

The head is provided with an outer removable nozzle in which the flame burns.

The particular design of the chamber allows an additional supply of oxygen to the base of the flame, thereby promoting combustion. The mixture of the two gases is done in the same nozzle of the torch.

Two models with head orientation at 45 ° or 90 ° are available.

Photo n°49: Diver with a Seafire torch (100)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

And finally in 1968 (101) we find the Vixen Kirkham M2, which was the last torch being manufactured by our English friends.

As can be appreciated, with the exception of the locking system of the trigger this torch resembles the model of the Seafire.

Photo n°50: Vixen Kirkham M2 torch (102)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Other countries also had their torch, but like everywhere else these have gradually been abandoned in favor of the electric cutting.

One of the main reasons is due to the fact that learning this technique is longer and more difficult.

Photo n° 51: Loosco Dutch torch (103)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 52: Hungarian torch from the twenties (104)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Figure n° 23: Hungarian torch (105)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 53: Italian torch with the automatic gas control unit (106)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

The problem with the underwater gas burning torches is that they sometimes need to be turned off (or sometimes go out from themselves) for a few minutes.

If the diver is working in shallow water, this does not pose much problem because all he had to do is ascend a few meters to reignite.

But this can quickly become annoying or impossible to do on deeper sites. As we have seen, Mr. Corné Mr. Picard and the Fabbrica italiana d'apparecchi per saldatura, Milano had solved this problem by inventing the pyrotechnic igniter and the pilot flame.

Elsewhere the electric ignition was privileged. In the early twenties (1920) two ignition systems appeared.

The American system that worked from a 110 volts DC power source and the English system that was rather using a 12-volt battery.

The implementation was more or less identical. When the diver wanted to light his torch, he first settled the length of the gas bubbles and then once done asked for juice. This depending on the system caused a spark which in turn lit the torch. Once it burned correctly the current was cut at surface and the cutting could start.

Figure n° 24: American ignition system (107)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Figure n° 25: English ignition system (108)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 54: Modern ignition system (109)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

As seen through the first three articles, underwater cutting torches helped make huge service and have greatly facilitated the work of divers.

They were intensely used until the fifties then gradually abandoned in favor of new cutting processes easier to use.

Currently, there is only one (real) underwater gas burning torch on the market: The PVL a Dutch manufactured torch that uses MAP gas or other by product. The torch is designed around the mixing nozzle of the P9 Picard torch making it therefore an EXCELLENT tool whose performances are identical to its model of reference.

Photo n° 55: PVL torch (110)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 56: Cutting course with the PVL (111)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Apart from this Dutch torch some (rare) manufacturers still offer the possibility to use their common torch under water by adapting a special cap on their head.

Photo n° 57: Pyrocopt combustion chambers (112)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 58: Petrogen cutting torch (113)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

Photo n° 59: Harris underwater cutting adapter (114)

Underwater cutting tools history (part 4)

To follow: The other cutting techniques

References :

My special thanks go to David L.Dekker and Lévai Miklós for their information supplied in the references n° 84, 85 (David) and 95,96,104-106 (Lévai).

(83) https://archive.org/stream/literarydigest65newy#page/n671/mode/2up/search/Reliant

(84) « Everything for the diver » « Everything for Submarine Operations » Siebe Gorman and Company,Limited / « Neptune » works, London, S.E.1 page 86-87

(85) « Everything for the diver » « Everything for Submarine Operations » Siebe Gorman and Company,Limited / « Neptune » works, London, S.E.1 page 88

(86) Shipbuilding & Shipping Record 1933 vol 41 page VI

(87) The Electrical Journal volume 120 page 308

(88) https://sites.google.com/site/rexidesilva/history-of-diving-in-sri-lanka

(89) DYKKEHISTORISK TIDSSKRIFT Nr 50-17 Argang 2013 page 4

(90) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 221

(91) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 222

(92) Marine Salvage by Joseph N. Gores 1972 David & Charles page 288-289

(93) https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints-depot-restricted/ships/battleships-uk/hms_valiant_1942_battleship-64634.jpg

(94) Deep Diving and Submarine Operation by Robert H.Davis /Siebe,Gorman & Company LTD CWMBRAN, GWENT 175 Anniversary edition / page 223

(95) Buvarismeretek by Ugray Karoly 1953 page 73

(96) Buvarismeretek by Ugray Karoly 1953 page ??

(97) http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/RN_Diving_Magazine_Vol_15_No_2.pdf page 12

(98) http://d121tcdkpp02p4.cloudfront.net/clim/112031/CIMG1409.JPG

(99) The Professional Diver’s Handbook by John Bevan Submex 2005 page 118

(100) https://pp.vk.me/c619917/v619917217/cdc1/p215pO7s5ws.jpg

(101) http://www.mcdoa.org.uk/RN_Diving_Magazine_Vol_15_No_2.pdf page 12

(102) The Master Diver and the Underwater Sportsman by Capt. T.A.Hampton 1970 David & Charles page 144

(103) http://www.pieds-lourds.com/Pages/pages.htm

(104) Buvarismeretek by Ugray Karoly 1953 page 70

(105) Buvarismeretek by Ugray Karoly 1953 page 72

(106) Buvarismeretek by Ugray Karoly 1953 page 74

(107) Underwater Work by Cayford Cornell Maritime Press 1966 page 112

(108) The Master Diver and the Underwater Sportsman by Capt. T.A.Hampton 1970 David & Charles page 102

(109) http://alahliyah.com/?page_id=7947

(110) http://www.pvlint.com/

(111) https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=827342850648855&set=o.249684318499419&type=3&theater

(112) http://www.saf-fro.fr/file/otherelement/pj/t%C3%A3%C2%AAtes%20de%20coupe37989.pdf

(113) http://www.petrogen.com/

(114) http://eu.harrisproductsgroup.com/en/Products/Equipment/Torches/Straight-Cutting/model-62-3fw.aspx